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Can California learn anything from the deadly Mexico quake?




Members of Mexico's armed forces remove debris from collapsed buildings after an 8.1 earthquake hit Mexico's Pacific coast on September 7, 2017 in Juchitan de Zaragoza, Oaxaca.
Members of Mexico's armed forces remove debris from collapsed buildings after an 8.1 earthquake hit Mexico's Pacific coast on September 7, 2017 in Juchitan de Zaragoza, Oaxaca.
PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images

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The death toll from the deadly earthquake in Mexico has reached to nearly one hundred people, with more confirmed victims in Oaxaca and Chiapas. 

And Mexican officials have described it as the largest earthquake to hit the country in the last 100 years.

But many experts believe that it could have been much worse, especially in nearby Mexico City.

Some point to a  similar earthquake that hit the country in 1985, Mexico was able to rebuild and better prepare for earthquakes.  So what kinds of things did Mexico do to improve earthquake readiness and can Los Angeles learn anything from it? 

We’ll talk about it with Kenneth W. Hudnut, Science Advisor for Risk Reduction for the US Geological Survey.