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Does low turnout for the Rams and Chargers mean LA is just not an NFL town?




Empty seats during the first half of a game between the Los Angeles Chargers and the Miami Dolphins  at StubHub Center on September 17, 2017.
Empty seats during the first half of a game between the Los Angeles Chargers and the Miami Dolphins at StubHub Center on September 17, 2017.
Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images

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There's been a lot of excitement about the return of the NFL to Los Angeles – and, a lot of hype.

The Rams came back last year. The Chargers joined them this season, ready to battle for the hearts and minds of L.A.'s football fan base with a marketing campaign.

Turns out, there might not be much to fight for.

On Sunday, the Rams and Chargers played games at the same time and just 13 miles apart. The combined attendance for both games was less than what the USC Trojans drew the night before. Just to show the numbers: 56,612 audience for the Rams plus the 25,381-Chargers only brings the total size to 81,993. The Trojans brought in a crowd of 84,714.

Makes you wonder if L.A. is just not an NFL-kind of town?

According to Vincent Bonsignore, NFL columnist for the Southern California News Group, that might be a bit presumptuous. For starters, comparing the crowds between college football and the NFL is like comparing apples to oranges.

"NFL fans are used to going to high-end stadiums, where there's clubs and there's restaurants and there's things to do," said Bonsignore in an interview with Take Two host A Martínez. "Whereas college fans enjoy tailgating, going to the game and then leaving. And that's basically the ritual of the college experience, so there's that to consider."

To listen to the full interview, use the blue media player above.