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DACA lawsuit filed by Dreamers themselves brings a human side to the issue




Children hold banners and placards while listening to speakers at a rally outside the 9th Circuit federal court in Pasadena, California on July 16, 2015.
Children hold banners and placards while listening to speakers at a rally outside the 9th Circuit federal court in Pasadena, California on July 16, 2015.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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Early this month, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced an end to the program that provided safe haven to people who were brought into the country illegally by their parents. For the 800,000 DACA recipients, that announcement triggered feelings of uncertainty and fear.

It also triggered law suits filed by 20 state attorneys general, including California's Xavier Becerra. Then on Monday came the first court action by people who themselves could be harmed if the program is terminated: six DACA recipients, who filed a suit in a San Francisco Federal Court. 

Dulce Garcia, an attorney based in San Diego, is one of those plaintiffs.

"The first thought in my mind was, we should sue. This isn't fair," said Garcia in an interview with Take Two host A Martinez. 

Dulce Garcia, an attorney based in San Diego, is one of the six DACA recipients involved in the latest lawsuit against the Trump administration over its ending of the DACA program. Garcia spoke with Take Two about the lawsuit.
Dulce Garcia, an attorney based in San Diego, is one of the six DACA recipients involved in the latest lawsuit against the Trump administration over its ending of the DACA program. Garcia spoke with Take Two about the lawsuit.
Courtesy of Dulce Garcia

 

For Garcia, this lawsuit brings a crucial ingredient to the legal battle over DACA: Dreamers themselves.

"Yes, I thought it was very important to have this lawsuit where it actually talked about our stories in a very personal and deep way," said Garcia. "I appreciate very much what the other plaintiffs are doing, including the state of California and the system. But it's much more important, I think, to have our own voices heard, and do it in a way that that we have a little control of the dialogue." 

To listen to the full interview with Garcia and hear about her life before and after DACA, use the blue media player above.