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Don't get hoaxed: misinformation spreads rapidly after breaking news




LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 01:  People take cover at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after apparent gun fire was heard on October 1, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  There are reports of an active shooter around the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.  (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 01: People take cover at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after apparent gun fire was heard on October 1, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. There are reports of an active shooter around the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
David Becker/Getty Images

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As of Monday morning, the Las Vegas shooting death toll climbed to 58 and more than 500 were injured. It is now considered the worst mass shooting in modern American history. From his hotel room, a lone gunman fired on concertgoers at the Route 91 Harvest Festival happening across the street.

More information is expected to pour out of Las Vegas in the coming days.  When it comes to breaking news like Las Vegas, there's always tons of information flying around, but not all of it is fact. 

Ryan Broderick is the deputy global news director at Buzzfeed. He's been writing about false stories and, this morning, zeroed in on those coming out of Las Vegas.

When Broderick spoke to A Martinez, he explained that the spread of misinformation typically happens in phases:

"The first wave of misinformation that hit Twitter was largely done by teenagers who were sort of just doing it to prank people...

The second wave as Americans started to wake up and internet communities started to get into gear, it was more political. So, you've got people on the far right figuring out how twist this for their own angles and platforms.

And I think that the period that we're now entering is where a lot of larger publishers are assigning which bits of fake news and which hoaxes they want to amplify for traffic for their Facebook crowd."

To hear more about the hoaxes being spread and tips on how to stay vigilant, click the blue play button above.