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After a bruising election, what's next for the California College Republicans?




Steve Bannon addresses the California GOP 2017 Convention in Anaheim, California on October 20, 2017.
Bannon, the architect of US President Donald Trump's nationalist-populist political stances and his election victory, is keynote speaker at the event.  / AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN        (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Steve Bannon addresses the California GOP 2017 Convention in Anaheim, California on October 20, 2017. Bannon, the architect of US President Donald Trump's nationalist-populist political stances and his election victory, is keynote speaker at the event. / AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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California Republicans converged on Anaheim this weekend. The main issue? How to get a better foothold in mostly blue California. But finding a way forward may be easier said than done with so much ideological division in the state party. 

That split showed Saturday during an election to determine who will lead the California College Republicans. The race pitted Breitbart writer and college senior Ariana Rowlands against centrist Leesa Danzek. After a tense session, Rowlands won.

Candidate Leesa Danzek says differing factions within the College Republicans contributed to the tension.

"I think the split is also indicative of the Republican party right now," Danzek says. "Especially here in California."

There are two different movements in the party right now fighting for the voice of Republicans, whether it's on campus or it's just within the community. 

The act of rally and shock and awe — there's a lot to make people begin to listen to the Republican voice, but it sometimes lacks in results. 

The other faction — something that I, particularly, see works — is to speak with people. Republicans are in the super minority in the legislature, and being able to build friendships and bring people into the community rather than give them a reason not to be friendly to the Republicans is something that I find important. 

Press the blue play button above to hear how Leesa Danzek sees the College Republicans moving forward.

(Answer has been edited for clarity.)