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Milo Yiannopoulos is coming to Cal State Fullerton — and that's fine by administrators




NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 21: Milo Yiannopoulos speaks during a press conference, February 21, 2017 in New York City. After comments he made regarding pedophilia surfaced in an online video, Yiannopoulos resigned from his position at Brietbart News, was uninvited to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) and lost a major book deal with Simon & Schuster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 21: Milo Yiannopoulos speaks during a press conference, February 21, 2017 in New York City. After comments he made regarding pedophilia surfaced in an online video, Yiannopoulos resigned from his position at Brietbart News, was uninvited to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) and lost a major book deal with Simon & Schuster. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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Conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos will speak at Cal State Fullerton tonight, in an event sponsored by the campus' Republican group. A crowd of more than 800 is expected.

But his presence on the campus isn't without controversy: more than 5,000 people signed a petition trying to stop it.

Campus police and federal agencies plan to beef-up security with pat-downs, metal detectors. Protestors are expected. 

So why this campus? Why this speaker? And why now?

Jeff Cook is the chief communications officer at Cal State Fullerton. He says the campus doesn't vet speakers brought in by campus groups. 

"The issue I think at hand is that even hateful speech is in-fact protected speech," Cook tells Take Two's A Martinez. 

There are few legal mechanisms; there are few pathways to shut that speech down. And even if there were a legal argument to be made, I think it's likely antithetical to higher education to be in the business of basically censoring the exchange of viewpoints.

Press the blue play button above to hear more about how students and faculty are responding.