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State of Affairs: Harassment in the capital gets called out




The California State Capitol in Sacramento.
The California State Capitol in Sacramento.
Mathieu Thouvenin (Flickr Creative Commons)

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This week on State of Affairs: 

Christina Bellantoni, assistant managing editor of politics for the LA Times, says that harassment in the political world has persisted for years.

"I covered Washington for many years. I lived there for 13 years, and certainly, the nation's capital is not immune to this at all," Bellantoni says. 

You start to go back and think about those stories — people talking about other people engaging in sexual activity after hours and gossiping. That's one of the cultures of a state house town. It just happens. 

Then there's actual unwanted action. They would tell young staffers: 'make sure not to get in an elevator with Strom Thurmond' because he was touchy or he would say something to you that would make you uncomfortable. That's something that I think for a long time was just not talked about. People accepted it as one of the things that just happens. 

I think this entire movement has just brought up that people want to say that we shouldn't accept it anymore. 

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