News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

The hole in the ozone layer shrunk this year




LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 14:  Traffic moves along the 110 freeway, after Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen L. Johnson this week announced a modest lowering of legal limits on ozone pollution standards, on March 14, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 14: Traffic moves along the 110 freeway, after Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen L. Johnson this week announced a modest lowering of legal limits on ozone pollution standards, on March 14, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

Listen to story

06:04
Download this story 4MB

Leaders from around the globe kicked off international climate talks today. The main subject is climate change and what countries can do to prevent it.

There are, of course, a lot of challenges. But there's also some good news. According to NASA, the hole in the earth's ozone layer is shrinking and it's getting smaller.

Paul A. Newman, chief Earth scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, spoke to A Martinez to explain the ozone layer's role and why its shrinking is such good news.

"It was discovered in 1985 and it was getting bigger and bigger, and in the 1990's we saw that it had really jumped to very large levels. In fact, the area of North America is about 9.5 million square miles, the ozone hole was jumping up to over 12 million square miles in the early 2000's.

This year, we saw the maximum size it got to is about 7.6 million square miles. So not as big as North America like we've seen in the past. So, this is really positive news. You have more ozone and so you get less UV."

To hear more about the ozone layer and why it shrunk this year, click the blue play button above.