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Crime & Justice

#MeToo and the place of 'innocent until proven guilty'




This combination photo shows, top row from left, film producer Harvey Weinstein, former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price, director James Toback, New Orleans chef John Besh, bottom row from left, fashion photographer Terry Richardson, New Republic contributing editor Leon Wiseltier, former NBC News political commentator Mark Halperin, former Defy Media executive Andy Signore
This combination photo shows, top row from left, film producer Harvey Weinstein, former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price, director James Toback, New Orleans chef John Besh, bottom row from left, fashion photographer Terry Richardson, New Republic contributing editor Leon Wiseltier, former NBC News political commentator Mark Halperin, former Defy Media executive Andy Signore
AP

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Powerful men from Hollywood, politics and beyond have been taken down in the past several months, one by one, by allegations of sexual harassment or assault.

The media coverage of those cases has been relentless.

As a result, many of those men may soon be looking at the end of their careers. Most of them, however, have not been found guilty of anything in a court of law.

Does the principle of "innocent until proven guilty" mean anything when you're facing the court of public opinion?

Take Two talks with Kathryn Bradley, professor of law at Duke University where she specializes in legal ethics.

Listen to the full interview. Click the blue audio player above.