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No Moore: Alabama loss could be a warning to SoCal's GOP lawmakers




Roy Moore, a Republican from Alabama, pauses while speaking during an election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. The defeat of Moore in Alabamas U.S. Senate race by Democrat Doug Jones was a stunning rebuke to the GOPs anti-establishment wing led by Steve Bannon and a major political embarrassment for President Donald Trump. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Roy Moore, a Republican from Alabama, pauses while speaking during an election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. The defeat of Moore in Alabamas U.S. Senate race by Democrat Doug Jones was a stunning rebuke to the GOPs anti-establishment wing led by Steve Bannon and a major political embarrassment for President Donald Trump. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

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Alabama's newest Democratic senator, Doug Jones, narrowly defeated Republican Roy Moore Tuesday. Moore has been dogged by accusations of sexual misconduct throughout his campaign. Moore's loss came despite a ringing endorsement from President Trump. 

A Democratic victory in Alabama was highly improbable. This might lead some to wonder what else could be possible in 2018 — especially in Southern California, where traditionally Republican pockets, like Orange County, have already shown signs of a shift ahead of what's certain to be a contentious election year.

For more on what Jones' Alabama might or might tell us about Southern California's political future, Take Two spoke to Raphael Sonenshein, executive director of the Pat Brown Institute for Public Affairs at CSU Los Angeles