News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.

Building resilience into LA infrastructure




To help the city handle climate-change effects like droughts and flooding, LADWP offers rebates on residential water tanks that can hold up to 1,000 gallons of water captured on site.
To help the city handle climate-change effects like droughts and flooding, LADWP offers rebates on residential water tanks that can hold up to 1,000 gallons of water captured on site.
Treepeople.org

Listen to story

05:03
Download this story 4.0MB

As fires continue to burn here in Southern California, the weather forecast today is sunny and 80 degrees. Even now, as we approach mid-December, the Los Angeles area has yet to experience any significant rain fall this season.

But rain will eventually make its way here. And climate scientists say it's likely to come in fast and furious bursts that will create a new set of problems. Is LA's infrastructure prepared to cope with our new normal of extreme weather and the droughts, wildfires and mud slides that come with it?

Andy Lipkis is founder of the community-oriented environmental group, Treepeople. He joined Take Two's Josie Huang to talk about how the city can become more resilient.

"The infrastructure that we built to protect public health and safety and meet our needs for water and sanitation and flood protection was built for a climate that we no longer have," Lipkis said. "That goes to the Governor saying fire is the new norm.  What we're experiencing is early onset climate impacts with hotter hots, wetter wets, drier drys that are breaking through the design capacity of our infrastructure."