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CES 2018: Ford embraces Living Streets, Toyota debuts driverless delivery




The Toyota e-Palette is a concept delivery vehicle that can be used to deliver people, packages and pizza.
The Toyota e-Palette is a concept delivery vehicle that can be used to deliver people, packages and pizza.
Toyota

The Consumer Electronics Show kicked off in Las Vegas Monday, and most of the major car companies are there showing off the technologies that will enable the emissions-free, driverless future everyone is always talking about.

"Imagining the dream city is easy. Rebuilding the existing ones will take real imagination and commitment, and it's something I'm committed to," said Ford Motor Company CEO Jim Hackett, during his keynote speech at CES Tuesday.

Hackett said he wasn't attending CES to sell cars. Rather, Ford is embracing an idea he calls living streets -- where transportation is focused around people rather than personal vehicles.

With something called the Transportation Mobility Cloud, Ford is working with cities and urban planners to help move people more efficiently by connecting the components of all levels of city transportation systems. Issuing a system design challenge to CES attendees, Ford hopes to help create a system where cities can reroute people to avoid construction or speed up emergency response. 

Toyota also debuted a mobility system at this year's CES. The Japanese auto maker announced it has partnered with Uber, Amazon, Pizza Hut, Mazda and other companies for something called the Driverless Delivery Vehicle Alliance. And it showed off a new driverless delivery vehicle -- the e-Palette.

The e-Palette delivery vehicles come in three sizes ranging from 13 to 23 feet, depending on the task, and are designed to deliver packages, pizza and people.