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Was Wahlberg's Time's up contribution too little too late?




BEVERLY HILLS, CA - DECEMBER 18:  Mark Wahlberg (L) and Michelle Williams attend the premiere of Sony Pictures Entertainment's
BEVERLY HILLS, CA - DECEMBER 18: Mark Wahlberg (L) and Michelle Williams attend the premiere of Sony Pictures Entertainment's "All The Money In The World" at Samuel Goldwyn Theater on December 18, 2017 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

A new focus on gender and pay inequality in the entertainment industry involving Mark Wahlberg and Michelle Williams has entered the spotlight. Plus, an iconic movie car thought to be long lost turned up in a garage in New Jersey. Vanity Fair's Rebecca Keegan stopped by Take Two to give us the latest on Hollywood business news for the weekly segment, On the Lot.

'All the money in the world' couldn't help Wahlberg

 The big story last week involves Mark Wahlberg, Michelle Williams and reshoot fees for the film "All the Money in the World." Wahlberg earned a paycheck of $1.5 million while Williams only earned about $1,000. The result of this coming to light? A lot of backlash.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXHrCBkIxQQ

To make things more awkward, Wahlberg and Williams are represented by the same agency, William Morris Entertainment Endeavor. 

"There are many different factors that go into what people make in Hollywood, primarily what you made before. In Mark Wahlberg's case the kinds of movies he makes like Transformers and Ted are very commercial movies. In Michelle Williams case she's best known for movies like 'Manchester by the Sea' and 'Blue Valentine'..."

Williams' performance in those films has been recognized, but they don't enjoy the same success of Wahlberg's films commercially. After days of backlash, Wahlberg opted to donate his reshoots paycheck to the Time's up campaign, an action that drew praise from Williams herself. But not everyone was impressed.

A disturbing account of sexual misconduct on the 'True Lies' set

Sexual harassment and assault allegations in Hollywood is something we've been covering for months now, and a new group has been outed: stuntmen. Actress Eliza Dushku who, at 12 years old starred in True Lies in 1994, said she was assaulted by her stunt coordinator. 

HOLLYWOOD, CA - APRIL 13:  Actress Eliza Dushku attends the alice + olivia by Stacey Bendet and Neiman Marcus present See-Now-Buy-Now Runway Show at NeueHouse Los Angeles on April 13, 2016 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - APRIL 13: Actress Eliza Dushku attends the alice + olivia by Stacey Bendet and Neiman Marcus present See-Now-Buy-Now Runway Show at NeueHouse Los Angeles on April 13, 2016 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)
Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

In a Facebook post she wrote over the weekend, Dushku outlined in detail that stuntman Joel Kramer molested her in his hotel room.

Since the post, co-star Jamie Lee Curtis and director James Cameron have released separate statements expressing sadness that this happened to Dushku while also denying any knowledge of the incident.

A car once thought to be lost has returned

The long-lost discovery of Steve McQueen's Mustang from the movie "Bullitt" caused quite a stir over the weekend.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31JgMAHVeg0

Thought to be lost, the car was unveiled in Detroit, along with Ford's plans to release a limited edition new Bullitt Mustang.

Keegan also spoke about this year's Oscar Awards frontrunners, why Academy members can't take back their votes, and why superhero films are long shots.