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After Perris, Assemblywoman Susan Eggman wants to better regulate home schools




Booking photos for David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin, who were arrested Sunday under suspicion of keeping 13 children locked up in a home in Perris, California.
Booking photos for David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin, who were arrested Sunday under suspicion of keeping 13 children locked up in a home in Perris, California.
Courtesy Riverside County Sheriff's Department

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Earlier this week, news broke that a couple in Perris, Calif., allegedly chained, beat and starved their 13 children. David and Louise Turpin have since been charged with torture and multiple other crimes. Both have pled not guilty.

Part of the reason they were able to remain undetected is because of their home's status as a private school. Now, attention is being focused on how to better regulate California's home schools.

"We have one of the least regulated home school programs in the country," said Assemblywoman Susan Eggman. Eggman is responsible for the 13th district of San Joaquin Valley. She's been a longtime advocate for tightening up rules to protect children who are schooled at home.

"The laws we have in place are not adequate," Eggman said.

How the home school system could be better regulated

At least some kind of annual home inspection. Then it comes to who's going to do it, right? Should it be Social Services? Should it be the Department of Education? Should it be public health? ... And, of course, who pays for that? There's all kinds of questions we still need to answer. But I think what we do know is that we need to do better.