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No Place Like LA: Simone found and lost her heart in LA




Simone Kussatz poses in front of the coast while on a hike.
Simone Kussatz poses in front of the coast while on a hike.
Simone Kussatz

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NO PLACE LIKE L.A. IS OUR SERIES THAT ASKS L.A. TRANSPLANTS AND IMMIGRANTS: "WHEN WAS THE MOMENT YOU FELT THAT LOS ANGELES WAS TRULY HOME?"

This is the story of Simone Kussatz in West Los Angeles.

I'm originally from Germany, and I always had that dream of coming to America because I loved to watch these classic Hollywood movies.

It was in 1986 that I came to San Francisco as an au pair, and I met Eric.

He said, when you ever come to Los Angeles, please come and visit me. I visited Eric for three days.

In those three days, we were driving up the 118 freeway. He had a red Alfa Romeo convertible.

He allowed me to drive, and as I was driving my hair was blowing in the wind. He tried to hold it back because it was blowing in my face!

I said to him, the man who wants to marry me needs to give me flowers every Friday.

I returned to San Francisco for another week before I returned to Germany, and it was a Friday when I open the door and there was a huge bouquet of flowers.

Then I was back in Germany and it was a Friday, and once again I had another bouquet of flowers sitting in front of our door.

It went on for two months.

In those two months, I received postcards and letters, and he would describe that it was so hot during the day due to the Santa Ana winds. And he would sit in a swimming pool at night, and the airplanes flying above him. 

It was May in Germany and it was still not really green yet.

Hearing those descriptions about the warm weather just made me, I don't know, it made me want to come back here.

He wanted me to move in with him right away and I did that, and it was home for me.

But it always looks different in my dreams when I wake up. The person actually passed away.

I don't regret it.

But whenever I look at a plane, I still have that same feeling as I had when I was really young and had those descriptions in those letter. I still get that same feeling.

It's true love, I have to say.

TELL US YOUR OWN STORY, TOO. IF YOU'RE A TRANSPLANT OR IMMIGRANT, WHAT WAS THE MOMENT WHERE YOU THOUGHT TO YOURSELF, "L.A. FEELS LIKE HOME, NOW?"