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'Dangerous' people could get guns taken under proposed bill




John Helms, owner of a weapons course, shows how to load a 22 Revolver used by students in the class during the South Florida Gun Show at Dade County Youth Fairgrounds in Miami, Florida, on February 17, 2018.
The gun show started three days after a mass shooting 30 miles (48kms) away at the Marjory Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Vendors said they were expecting a big turnout and sales, and because of the shooting there will be a panic regarding gun restrictions and new laws that could be put in place. Vendor Domingo Martin said he brought his entire stock of of 42 AR-15's, adding that he is not the only one selling the unit at the weekend show.  / AFP PHOTO / Michele Eve Sandberg        (Photo credit should read MICHELE EVE SANDBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
John Helms, owner of a weapons course, shows how to load a 22 Revolver used by students in the class during the South Florida Gun Show at Dade County Youth Fairgrounds in Miami, Florida, on February 17, 2018. The gun show started three days after a mass shooting 30 miles (48kms) away at the Marjory Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Vendors said they were expecting a big turnout and sales, and because of the shooting there will be a panic regarding gun restrictions and new laws that could be put in place. Vendor Domingo Martin said he brought his entire stock of of 42 AR-15's, adding that he is not the only one selling the unit at the weekend show. / AFP PHOTO / Michele Eve Sandberg (Photo credit should read MICHELE EVE SANDBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
MICHELE EVE SANDBERG/AFP/Getty Images

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Say you have a family member who you believe to be a danger to themselves or others. Under a California law that went into effect in 2016, you can petition a court to take away their guns and prevent them from buying new ones for up to 21 days. It's known as the "gun violence restraining order" system.

Now, a new bill could extend this right to report to school staff, mental health workers, and even your colleagues. 

The bill is the brainchild of Assemblyman Phil Ting and was initially proposed in the wake of the San Bernardino terrorist attacks that left 14 dead. Gov. Jerry Brown ultimately rejected the proposal, saying that the initial gun restraining order had yet to be tested. 

Since then, though, there's more information about how the restraining order system has worked: courts in California issued 86 orders in 2016. Now, just days after another deadly shooting spree at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Asm. Ting is proposing his legislation again. 

If the bill makes it to Gov. Brown's desk, how might he act? Capital Public Radio's Ben Adler says it's hard to know which way he might lean.

Jerry Brown has tended to go to his typical "paddle a little to the left, paddle a little to the right" political methodology with gun bills. 

He often will get a package of them landing on his desk all at once. He will sign some, he will veto some, he'll go through one-by-one, and when he vetoes some of the measures, he says 'I just don't see how this is really going to make a difference in preventing criminals from having guns as opposed to only law-abiding citizens.' He tends to pick things up one-by-one. 

This is his final year in office. I don't expect him to depart from that philosophy. I'm sure he'll find out how the 2016 law has been going, and if he feels it needs to be expanded then he'll sign it, and if not then he won't. 



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