News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.

Generation Z just might transform America




A Parkland shooting protest in downtown Los Angeles Monday brought out three friends asking Congress to act on gun control.
A Parkland shooting protest in downtown Los Angeles Monday brought out three friends asking Congress to act on gun control.
Josie Huang/KPCC

Listen to story

06:10
Download this story 8.0MB

It's been just one week since a grisly shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, left 17 students and staff dead. Since then, there have been protests, Facebook fights, debates between TV pundits — all the stuff we've come to expect after such a tragedy. 

But there's a new voice in the national dialogue this time around: a younger generation has started speaking out against gun violence, demanding change from lawmakers. You may call them high schoolers; they're also known as Generation Z. President Trump will meet with some today. Earlier this week, you might have seen them staging a die-in in front of the White House, or protesting in Pershing Square.

So who is Generation Z, and how might they help shape the country? 

Jonah Stillman is one of them. He's the author of the book "Gen Z @ Work." 

He says Generation Z is realistic, digitally connected, and hungry for social change. 

I think we have a generation of change makers, and we're willing to take things into our own hands. Looking at the progression of gun laws, we have seen very little [change], so I think we're ready to take action and that's why you're starting to see the voice of Gen Z really take the main stage. If anything, I think it's just going to become more prominent. It's one of the first times that the young generation is starting to take charge and I'm very excited to see what our generation has the power to accomplish.

(Answer has been edited for clarity.)