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Weinstein Co. will file for bankruptcy. What's next?




LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 12: Demonstrators participate in the #MeToo Survivors' March in response to several high-profile sexual harassment scandals on November 12, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. The protest was organized by Tarana Burke, who created the viral hashtag #MeToo after reports of alleged sexual abuse and sexual harassment by the now disgraced former movie mogul, Harvey Weinstein. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 12: Demonstrators participate in the #MeToo Survivors' March in response to several high-profile sexual harassment scandals on November 12, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. The protest was organized by Tarana Burke, who created the viral hashtag #MeToo after reports of alleged sexual abuse and sexual harassment by the now disgraced former movie mogul, Harvey Weinstein. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
David McNew/Getty Images

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It's the end of the road for awards show season. This weekend, it's the big one. The 90th Academy Awards hosted by Jimmy Kimmel will air Sunday at 5 p.m.

So, how will the telecast grapple with the shadow of the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements? Vanity Fair's Rebecca Keegan has watched the telecast from the stage wings for years and has some insight:

"I imagine that host Jimmy Kimmel will probably address this in his monologue as previous hosts have addressed topical issues like #OscarsSoWhite, for instance. We've also seen some sort of evidence of anticipating controversy and getting out of the way of it."

Keegan is referring to Casey Affleck recusing himself of presenting the Best Supporting Actress award at this year's ceremony. It's customary for the winner of the previous year's Best Supporting role to present to the opposite sex. Affleck has been sued for sexual harassment in the past.

The #MeToo movement was sparked by the multiple sexual conduct allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, who owned the now doomed Weinstein Company.

For months, the company was in talks to be sold to a group of investors led by Maria Contreras Sweets until the New York Attorney General's office filed a civil rights lawsuit against the Weinstein Company and its co-founders. So what will happen to all the company's assets?

 "I don't know if you're interested in buying, say, the rights to "Project Runway," or the "King's Speech." I think the Weinstein Company is now going to be sold for parts. The company's library, the rights to its shows and movies are likely all going to be sold."

As for its approximately 130 employees, hopefully, they've updated their resumes and are ready to make some phone calls.