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Aftermath of Supreme Court decision to not take on DACA




People who call themselves DREAMers protest in front of the U.S. Capitol on December 6, 2017. They want Congress to passing a legislative fix for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.
People who call themselves DREAMers protest in front of the U.S. Capitol on December 6, 2017. They want Congress to passing a legislative fix for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.
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On Monday, the path for DACA recipients took another turn. The Supreme Court declined the Trump Administration's appeal to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which was set to phase out this coming week. 

As the confusion continues, there remains no clear path forward on how to create a legal framework for those currently protected under the Obama-era program.

Take Two checked in with DACA recipient Safir Wazed. He was brought here as a child from Bangladesh and is currently a graduate student at the University of Southern California.

"I'm still confused and very frustrated," Wazed says. "We are exactly where we were when Jeff Sessions announced that DACA would end."

Now on the job market, Wazed feels the pressure to unveil his uncertain status to his potential employers. 

"When we get to that conversation, that means the interview is going well," Wazed says. "But I do have to pivot it a bit." 

The latest developments are changing the political debate surrounding the program. 

"I suspect lawmakers are feeling less pressure now," says Louis DeSipio, professor of political science and chicano studies at UC-Irvine. "Congress tried to come up with a resolution a few weeks ago and failed. Now with the court temporarily protecting DACA, Congress might move on to other issues."

However, as long as there's no fix for DACA, it will continue to be political. 

"It keeps the issues in the debate for all these moderate house seats they have to defend in the fall," DeSipio says. "The Democrats will have a clear issue to mobilize around. It will help Democrats in the fall." 

As for Wazed, the DACA recipient, he's hopeful about where things are headed. 

"We will not stop fighting until we get what we want, which is a path to citizenship," Wazed says.