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The juvenile justice approach is changing




Students take an African drumming class at Camp Afflerbaugh, a juvenile detention facility in La Verne, on Wednesday afternoon, May 4, 2016. At the conclusion of the 11-week class, students will receive a certificate of achievement they can show to a judge.
Students take an African drumming class at Camp Afflerbaugh, a juvenile detention facility in La Verne, on Wednesday afternoon, May 4, 2016. At the conclusion of the 11-week class, students will receive a certificate of achievement they can show to a judge.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC

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Los Angeles County is in the process of changing how it treats incarcerated teenagers. It's a new approach called the L.A. Model, and it aims to provide care rather than just correction. One part of that is, surprisingly, arts education.

KPCC reporter Carla Javier is hosting an event Thursday night at the station to talk about L.A. Model, and she joined Take Two's A Martinez for a preview.

What is L.A. Model?

It's supposed to focus on things like care, healing, and support rather than a more traditional view of corrections. They are trying to accomplish that by rejecting what you might think of or assume when you think of a juvenile facility. Instead of prison uniforms, the youth wear slacks and polos.
 
Instead of military barrack-style housing, the youth actually live in these buildings that, to me, resemble college dorms and common spaces.
 
These aesthetic changes are supposed to reflect a change in approach, away from a rigid model, to one where the youth have personalized programming available to them.

For more information on the event taking place Thursday, March 22, click here.