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Potential choices to opt-out of Facebook data sharing




Facebook suspended Cambridge Analytica, a data-analysis firm that worked for President Trump's 2016 campaign, over allegations that it held onto improperly obtained user data after telling Facebook it had deleted the information.
Facebook suspended Cambridge Analytica, a data-analysis firm that worked for President Trump's 2016 campaign, over allegations that it held onto improperly obtained user data after telling Facebook it had deleted the information.
Matt Rourke/AP

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It's a big day for Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, who is testifying before Congress Tuesday. It comes one day after Facebook started alerting users who had been affected by its sharing of data with Cambridge Analytica. About 87 million users may be seeing those notifications in their news feed.

Facebook's data-sharing practices have raised a lot of questions about how it protects consumer information, including how the tech giant might give users the ability to intentionally opt-in to data sharing.

April Glaser is a tech reporter for Slate, who has some ideas of what future privacy options may be available on Facebook.

Glaser said that European privacy rights could impact users here in the U.S.

On May 25, there's going to be a new suite of privacy laws for online that's starting in Europe. It will allow users to control what data a company has on them, to request that data to get info on who it's been shared with...all kinds of personal rights. That requires Facebook to get a whole architecture to comply with that....That scaffolding could port those privacy rights over to the U.S.

Glaser also said that Facebook "has tried to give people more control over their privacy settings. Moving it to the newsfeed page." However, Facebook has not said it will stop collecting data for ads.