News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.

California leads the fight in net neutrality, toilets will come to Venice, the World cup in LA




The Federal Communications Commission rollback of net neutrality went into effect today. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai championed the move, while commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel opposed it.
The Federal Communications Commission rollback of net neutrality went into effect today. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai championed the move, while commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel opposed it.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Listen to story

49:28
Download this story 35.0MB

Following the Federal Communications Commission rollback of net neutrality rules this week, California pushes forward with its own plan to preserve it. Plus, we find out why the Koch brothers' $5 million donation to Chapman University in Orange County is causing controversy. And we learn why Angelenos should still care about the World Cup even if L.A. doesn't have a team in the world's most famous soccer tournament.

The effect of Prop 47

Four years ago California voters passed Prop 47. It reclassified some non-violent crimes like grand theft and fraud as misdemeanors. Before, they were felonies. And the idea was to reduce the prison population. It's been the bane of law enforcement officials, however. Many of them say since Prop 47 passed it's led to an increase in violent crimes of all kinds. But one of the first major studies on the effects of the initiative tells us a different story.

Guest:

You can check out the study below:
 

Plus:

Despite what that new study says, police officers have blamed Prop 47 for years for what they see as an increase in crime. We get an opposing view on the study.

Guest:

Women lead the way in upcoming video games

The Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3 as it's better known, is the main event when it comes to video games. Industry professionals and fans are flocking to the L.A. Convention Center for a cornucopia of new video game technology for the next few days. And among the new releases are a noticeable number of games feature woman characters. Women are the stars of upcoming games like "The Last of Us 2,” "Sea of Solitude” and “Youngblood.” And the way they're portrayed seems to be more nuanced and less sexualized than how video games did it in the past.

Guest:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIsFuxPs2IA

Even if LA doesn't have a team in the World Cup, it's still a big deal for local fans

The international soccer extravaganza known as the World Cup kicks off this week. And while there isn't a U.S. team competing, it's still the biggest deal in sports right now. So why should Angelenos care?

Guests:

California challenges federal rollback of net neutrality

The FCC's net neutrality rules were officially repealed earlier this week. That means Internet providers like Spectrum and Charter can now block, slow or give special treatment to certain content. But even if net neutrality is dead, the fight to keep it remains alive —particularly here in the Golden State.

Guest:

https://twitter.com/vanschewick/status/1000111237517131776

Homeless bathrooms come to Venice

The L.A. County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously yesterday to expand homeless services in a handful of neighborhoods. The Rose Avenue beach parking lot in Venice will soon get two portable toilets and hand-washing stations. And two county-owned buildings in Hollywood and North Hollywood will each open their parking lots overnight to homeless people living in their vehicles.

Guest:

A homeless man with his dog stops at a trash bin to search for recyclable cans as beach-goers head home for the day at Venice Beach in Los Angeles, California, 28 August 2003.
A homeless man with his dog stops at a trash bin to search for recyclable cans as beach-goers head home for the day at Venice Beach in Los Angeles, California, 28 August 2003.
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images