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Will driverless cars cut down commute times? Local Croatian and French soccer fans square off, Black infant mortality rates in Toledo




The Google self-driving car maneuvers through the streets of in Washington, DC May 14, 2012. The system on a modified Toyota Prius combines information gathered from Google Street View with artificial intelligence software that combines input from video cameras inside the car, a LIDAR sensor on top of the vehicle, radar sensors on the front of the vehicle and a position sensor attached to one of the rear wheels that helps locate the car's position on the map. As of 2010, Google has tested several vehicles equipped with the system, driving 1,609 kilometres (1,000 mi) without any human intervention, in addition to 225,308 kilometres (140,000 mi) with occasional human intervention. Google expects that the increased accuracy of its automated driving system could help reduce the number of traffic-related injuries and deaths, while using energy and space on roadways more efficiently.  AFP PHOTO/Karen BLEIER        (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/GettyImages)
The Google self-driving car maneuvers through the streets of in Washington, DC May 14, 2012. The system on a modified Toyota Prius combines information gathered from Google Street View with artificial intelligence software that combines input from video cameras inside the car, a LIDAR sensor on top of the vehicle, radar sensors on the front of the vehicle and a position sensor attached to one of the rear wheels that helps locate the car's position on the map. As of 2010, Google has tested several vehicles equipped with the system, driving 1,609 kilometres (1,000 mi) without any human intervention, in addition to 225,308 kilometres (140,000 mi) with occasional human intervention. Google expects that the increased accuracy of its automated driving system could help reduce the number of traffic-related injuries and deaths, while using energy and space on roadways more efficiently. AFP PHOTO/Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/GettyImages)
KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images

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State of Affairs 

(Starts at 1:28)

It's our weekly peek at politics in the Golden State. House majority leader Kevin McCarthy says he's not campaigning for Paul Ryan's job as House speaker. Meanwhile, private prisons have greased a lot of political palms in the state.

Guests:

Black Infant Mortality: Toledo

(Starts at 15:17)

Black babies in the United States are twice as likely to die before their first birthday as white babies. Over the past few days, we've been bringing you stories about what's behind this gap and what's being done to close it. Today, we leave California and head to the Midwest. Ohio has some of the highest infant mortality rates in the nation. KPCC's Priska Neely has the story of a community that's focusing on tangible things that moms and dads can to help.

Children Crossing: Part Five

(Starts at 20:41)

All this week, we have examined immigration on Take Two, by asking listeners to share their stories of how they came to America as kids. Today, we hear from Paul Galarreta, who came to California from Lima, Peru when he was just nine years old. His family lived a good, middle-class life there back in the 80s. But soon, coordinated attacks by the communist group Sendero Luminoso made life in the city unsafe. Then, things got worse.

You can hear Paul's story below:

You can listen to the rest of the "Children Crossing" series here.

SoCal Summer Hacks: Mosquitoes

(Starts at 36:00)

Now, if beating the heat wasn't enough this week another summer plague is upon us. Here at Take Two, we want you to get the absolute most out of your summer. We've literally got your back. This week on our SoCal Summer Hacks series, Tamika Adams is here to help you keep the worst pests of summer at bay.

No driver may equal a faster commute

(Starts at 30:15)

Automated vehicles, sometimes called driverless cars, could help trim down commute times for all of us, according to KPCC's Sue Carpenter, who has been covering a huge symposium for the industry in San Francisco.

Vive le World Cup

(Starts at 39:35)

Los Angeles has the second-largest population of French natives in the U.S., and at last count all 11,000 of them are huge soccer fans.

All eyes were on the game at the last France Fan Club event for the World Cup. (Photo by The France Fan Club)
All eyes were on the game at the last France Fan Club event for the World Cup. (Photo by The France Fan Club)
The France Fan Club

At the same time, go ahead, take a wild guess about where the biggest Croatian population on the West Coast is — yep, you are correct, and the biggest concentration of those Croats is in San Pedro. 

Croatian soccer fans with the L.A. Croatians or 'L.A. Vatreni' fan group are looking forward to the World Cup final. (Photo by Los Angeles Croatians)
Croatian soccer fans with the L.A. Croatians or 'L.A. Vatreni' fan group are looking forward to the World Cup final. (Photo by Los Angeles Croatians)
Los Angeles Croatians

We'll hear from fans on both sides of the finals about where they'll watch the match.

Guests:

Read more at LAist.

27 Fabulous Events Happening This Weekend In Southern California

(Starts at 44:20)

Cooler temperatures are headed our way so you can't use that excuse to skip fabulous outdoor events, from a Greek festival and a party for the Colorado Bridge to a screening of "Coco" under the stars and an artwalk in South Gate.

Guests: