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California's fuel-economy rules under attack, Trader Joes in Silverlake reopens, the history of LA baseball




LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 21:  Cars travel along State Route 110  on February 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. According to a report by Kirkland, Washington based traffic analytics firm INRIX, Los Angeles is the most traffic-clogged city in the world. Motorists in Los Angeles spent an average of 104 hours in traffic in 2016 that amounted to an estimated $2,408 per driver in wasted fuel and productivity.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 21: Cars travel along State Route 110 on February 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. According to a report by Kirkland, Washington based traffic analytics firm INRIX, Los Angeles is the most traffic-clogged city in the world. Motorists in Los Angeles spent an average of 104 hours in traffic in 2016 that amounted to an estimated $2,408 per driver in wasted fuel and productivity. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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An attack on California's fuel economy rules

(Starts at 1:26)

The Trump Administration has been talking about moves for months now to repeal of fuel economy standards and reports say that a decision could come down on this as early as tomorrow, which would also effectively take away California's ability to set its own emission standards. 

China + L.A. Trade

(Starts at 12:04)

Mayor Eric Garcetti warned on Tuesday that the US-China trade may hurt Los Angeles. While on his trip to secure trade relations in Asian countries, Garcetti stated that potential job loss may hit the region by lack of Chinese investment and this could hinder L.A.'s economic growth. So do the warnings about the future of L.A.’s economy hold merit?

Guest:

Business schools reaching gender equity

(Starts at 17:01)

The USC Marshall School of Business announced that this year, their incoming MBA class is 52 percent female. That's the first time the school has reached gender-parity and the highest among the country's top programs, including UCLA, Berkeley, and Harvard. Often seen as the first step to the executive-suite, business schools have struggled to maintain a balanced ratio between men and women. 

Guest:

How SoCal's transit agencies are partnering with Uber and Lyft

(Starts at 22:54)

A new report out today from the Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development at DePaul University looks at transit agency partnerships with ride-hail companies like Uber and Lyft to see if they're really working to resolve cities' transportation challenges. L.A., Monrovia, San Clemente and San Diego are all working with Uber and Lyft.

Guest:

Trader Joes in Silverlake reopens

(Starts at 30:00)

Following lat month's deadly police shoot out, the Trader Joes in Silverlake is reopening, and it's got a brand new look.

Flowers and messages in memoriam line a wall at the Silver Lake Trader Joe's where an assistant manager was killed on July 21, 2018 during a police shootout with a suspect.
Flowers and messages in memoriam line a wall at the Silver Lake Trader Joe's where an assistant manager was killed on July 21, 2018 during a police shootout with a suspect.
Bradley Bermont/KPCC

Can payday lending be reigned in? 

(Starts at 33:48)

Every year, about 1 in 20 Californians will take out a payday loan. That amounts to about $3 billion dollars borrowed annually. But the cost of those loans is often steep. Think triple-digit interest rates. State legislators have tried to reign-in these companies, but almost every attempt has failed. The one active bill remaining will get a hearing when lawmakers reconvene. What chance does it have?

Guest: 

LA Baseball

(Starts at 40:01)

A Martinez went to the L.A. Central Library to chat with curator David Davis about a new photo exhibit on the history of baseball in the city. It's not just about the Dodgers although that is a part of the story, baseball has been around in L.A. for a long time and has grown to reflect the unique personality and diversity of SoCal.

The first named 'Wrigley Field' was actually a stadium in Los Angeles built by William Wrigley, the owner of the Cubs. It was home to a minor league team from L.A. and later to a T.V. show call
The first named 'Wrigley Field' was actually a stadium in Los Angeles built by William Wrigley, the owner of the Cubs. It was home to a minor league team from L.A. and later to a T.V. show call "Home Run Derby."
Los Angeles Public Library