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Remembering Aretha Franklin, using cannabis to treat children, the real history of the Formosa Cafe




Television still of Don Cornelius with Aretha Franklin.
Television still of Don Cornelius with Aretha Franklin.
Tribune Entertainment/Getty Images

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A doctor with Children's Hospital Los Angeles says cannabis could be useful in treating some medical conditions in young patients. Plus, Metro will use body scanners to detect wearable explosives and suicide vests. And the real history of West Hollywood's Formosa Cafe.

The voice of the Queen of soul… now an angel 

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Aretha Franklin died at her home in Detroit today. She was 76. The woman known and loved by many as the "Queen of Soul" had a career that spanned over six decades. She won 18 grammy awards … and sold more than 75 MILLION albums. But perhaps one of her biggest and and most well-known contributions to music came relatively early in her life, after performances at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in L.A. It was January of 1972. Just before her 30th birthday. The album that would result — titled Amazing Grace —would go on to become one of the best-selling gospel records of all time. About two million albums.

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https://www.facebook.com/taketwoshow/videos/858103797720948/

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Housing the homeless in your backyard

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Homelessness has reached crisis levels in many Southern California communities. Everybody wants a solution. But what happens when that solution includes housing the homeless in YOUR neighborhood? That's the debate embroiling residents in the northern Orange County city of Fullerton.

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Using cannabis to treat children

(Starts at 18:41)

We hear from an epilepsy doctor at Children's Hospital Los Angeles about new developments in using marijuana to treat kids. How doctors are speaking with parents about using cannabis to care for young patients.

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LA Metro will be first ground transportation in the nation to use body scanners

(Starts at 25:25)

Union Station passengers who rode the escalator to the Metro Red Line Tuesday had their bodies scanned and screened by Metro officials. It was part of a demonstration to show how a new type of technology can help detect suicide vests and other wearable explosives on the county's transit system. Metro has purchased several of these portable body scanners and is deploying them in partnership with the U.S. Transportation Security Administration. It will be the first surface transportation system in the country to use them.

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https://twitter.com/metrolosangeles/status/1029554536631992324

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The real history of the Formosa Cafe

(Starts at 42:26)

In its heyday, the Formosa Cafe in West Hollywood attracted the likes of Ava Gardner, Humphrey Bogart and Frank Sinatra, to name just a few of its most famous patrons. So when it quietly closed down in 2016 following a disastrous makeover, hearts were broken. And when talks of plans to restore and reopen it emerged last year, hearts were once again feeling the love.

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Exterior of the famous Formosa Cafe
Exterior of the famous Formosa Cafe
Joshua Barash

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