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NIMBYism in Fullerton, teaching consent, state of the gas tax




Carl DeMaio assists the owner of a Mobil gas station near Interstate 5 in Encinitas as she changes the price sign. DeMaio, of Reform California, used the price-lowering events to draw in potential supporters of a petition to repeal the state's new gas tax.
Carl DeMaio assists the owner of a Mobil gas station near Interstate 5 in Encinitas as she changes the price sign. DeMaio, of Reform California, used the price-lowering events to draw in potential supporters of a petition to repeal the state's new gas tax.
Sharon McNary/KPCC

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We have the third in our series on how Fullerton is dealing with its homelessness crisis. Also, we speak with a third-grade teacher about a lesson she developed to teach third graders the meaning of consent in the age of #MeToo. And, the latest with the California gas tax.

SCOTUS Immigration

(Starts at 1:22)

Justice Brett Kavanaugh sat on the bench for the first time Tuesday, taking his seat next to Justice Elena Kagan. According to the L.A. Times, whose reporter was at the court, it was a pretty mellow day considering Kavanaugh's contentious confirmation hearing. His first case Tuesday was about the interpretation of federal sentencing law. Wednesday, it's an immigration case that arose from a class-action lawsuit in California. 

Guest:

Teaching Consent to third graders

(Starts at 8:46)

The confirmation process for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh brought the issue of consent into the spotlight. But despite being in the headlines for weeks, consent can still be a confusing concept for children. So one Silverlake teacher decided to address the idea head-on, with an age-appropriate lesson for her third-grade class. 

Guest:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BoNJL9tBcyb/

Vote at 16: the high school students trying to lower the voting age for school board elections

(Starts at 14:50)

With the November midterms less than a month away, we've spent a lot of time talking about voters— young voters, women voters, independents. So, now we're talking about a group of high schoolers who are not voting but would like to. Specifically, these Alhambra students want to be able to vote for their district's school at age 16, because they say 16 is old enough to weigh in on who makes up board that oversees their schools.

Some of the members of Vote at 16 San Gabriel Valley, with Alhambra Unified School District Board Members, Robert Gin and Joanne Russel Chavez, at the school board candidate round table held by the student group.
Some of the members of Vote at 16 San Gabriel Valley, with Alhambra Unified School District Board Members, Robert Gin and Joanne Russel Chavez, at the school board candidate round table held by the student group.
KPCC/Emily Henderson

Fullerton NIMBYism, Part 3

(Starts at 18:04)

We look at Fullerton's troubled history dealing with the homeless, including a fatal police beating that put the city in the national spotlight. 

Guest:

Juvie Fees

(Starts at 23:12)

L.A. County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to stop collecting old juvenile detention fees, which were charged to families of incarcerated youth.

Guest:

https://twitter.com/HildaSolis/status/1049795638919979008

Dodgers: when is it too early to celebrate?

(Starts at 30:15)

Friday, the Dodgers will be in Milwaukee to play the Brewers in Game one of the National League Championship Series. It's the fourth time in the last six years they've gotten this far. We preview the series and we'll also discuss if all their recent celebrating is hollow unless they finally go all the way?

Guests:

https://twitter.com/AMartinezLA/status/1049747171413647360

The state of the Gas Tax

(Starts at 40:47)

Californians' gas tax and vehicle fees went up last November to fund much-needed infrastructure projects. Now Prop 6 on the ballot would roll it back. It's time for voters to decide between cheaper gas or better roads, and whether they trust the government to actually spend the money on improving roads and transportation.

Guest:

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