News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.

LA County sexual harassment, the Great Shakeout, de Leon v. Feinstein conversation




A resident and a cameraman look at damage to the Kaiser Permanente Building following the Northridge earthquake, on January 17, 1994. The earthquake measured 6.6 on the Richter scale and was centered in the San Fernando Valley.
A resident and a cameraman look at damage to the Kaiser Permanente Building following the Northridge earthquake, on January 17, 1994. The earthquake measured 6.6 on the Richter scale and was centered in the San Fernando Valley.
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

49:12
Download this story 35.0MB

In this #MeToo era, we take a close look at sexual harassment in local government. Plus, how Los Angeles is handling earthquake retrofits of vulnerable buildings. And a recap of Wednesday's conversation between California Senator Kevin de Leon and U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein.

L.A. County Sexual Harassment

(Starts at 1:15)

Over the past year, we’ve heard a lot about sexual harassment in entertainment and politics. But we’ve heard little about the misconduct that takes place in local government. A team of KPCC journalists dug into the issue at Los Angeles County. With more than 100,000 employees, it’s the biggest local government in the nation. They found troubling allegations of sexual impropriety.

Guest:

More on LAist.com

LA County's decision to restore a cross to the depiction of the San Gabriel Mission on its official seal is being challenged by the ACLU.
LA County's decision to restore a cross to the depiction of the San Gabriel Mission on its official seal is being challenged by the ACLU.
AP

While making other marital affairs a campaign issue, John Cox stays mum on his own

(Starts at 7:46)

The Republican candidate for California Governor John Cox continues to bring up his democratic opponent's extramarital affair as a way to score political points. Turns out, court records from Cox's divorce from his first wife include allegations that he strayed from his first marriage.

Guest:

More on LAist.com

California GOP Gubernatorial Candidate John Cox speaks during an election eve party at the U.S. Grant Hotel on June 5, 2018 in San Diego. Cox, a businessman from Rancho Santa Fe, CA, is the leading Republican candidate for governor of California.
California GOP Gubernatorial Candidate John Cox speaks during an election eve party at the U.S. Grant Hotel on June 5, 2018 in San Diego. Cox, a businessman from Rancho Santa Fe, CA, is the leading Republican candidate for governor of California.
Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

The Senate —uh— debate?

(Starts at 14:50)

If you tuned into the live stream of yesterday’s Senate discussion in San Francisco expecting to see flying sparks, you were likely disappointed. After months of back and forth, Senator Dianne Feinstein and State Senator Kevin de Leon finally shared a stage in San Francisco. But it was not a debate. The conversation covered topics ranging from immigration to impeachment. From high-speed rail to healthcare. So how did it all go, and will it move the needle much for voters? We ask Christina Bellantoni, a professor at USC's Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism and former assistant managing editor of politics for the LA Times. 

Miss the discussion? Catch it here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03PlS2np2wA

Pasadena Road Diets

(Starts at 20:36)

Pasadena is permanently setting aside it’s Orange Grove Blvd. road diet plan, due to the long history of controversy and resident complaints. We look at why the road diet was first proposed, what critics had to say, and what the city has learned that could change how proposals like it are handled moving forward. 

Guest:

Soft Structures

(Starts at 26:02)

In 2016, L.A. flagged more than 13,000 "soft story" buildings that could be vulnerable in the next quake. Ordinances were passed to retrofit these structures. On the day of the Great Shakeout, we ask: where are we at?

Guest:

Two men inspect damage to cars and apartment complex after Northridge earthquake, on January 21, 1994, in Canoga, California. Federal inspectors report that several hundred homes have been condemned and as many as 40,000 will need repairs. The Northridge earthquake occurred on January 17, 1994 at 4:31 AM Pacific Standard Time in Reseda, a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, California. The earthquake had a 'strong' moment magnitude of 6.7, but the ground acceleration was the highest ever instrumentally recorded in an urban area in North America.
Two men inspect damage to cars and apartment complex after Northridge earthquake, on January 21, 1994, in Canoga, California. Federal inspectors report that several hundred homes have been condemned and as many as 40,000 will need repairs. The Northridge earthquake occurred on January 17, 1994 at 4:31 AM Pacific Standard Time in Reseda, a neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles, California. The earthquake had a 'strong' moment magnitude of 6.7, but the ground acceleration was the highest ever instrumentally recorded in an urban area in North America.
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

What to do if you're driving, bicycling or taking the train during an earthquake

(Starts at 30:52)

As part of the Great Shakeout, we reached out to transportation experts to find out what you should do if you're driving a car or riding a train, bus, bicycle or motorcycle when the Big One, or even a small one, hits.

More on KPCC.org

Bricks and fallen rubble cover a car with the old courthouse in the background following an earthquake Sunday, Aug. 24, 2014, in Napa, Calif. A large earthquake rolled through California's northern Bay Area early Sunday, damaging some buildings, igniting fires, knocking out power to tens of thousands and sending residents running out of their homes in the darkness.
Bricks and fallen rubble cover a car with the old courthouse in the background following an earthquake Sunday, Aug. 24, 2014, in Napa, Calif. A large earthquake rolled through California's northern Bay Area early Sunday, damaging some buildings, igniting fires, knocking out power to tens of thousands and sending residents running out of their homes in the darkness.
Eric Risberg/AP

School preparedness in case of the ‘Big One’

(Starts at 39:19)

What the district has planned to assist students in case of a significant earthquake.

Guest:

CERT Training

(Starts at 43:15)

Los Angeles is one of the most disaster-prone cities in the world, vulnerable to earthquakes, fires and many other disasters. So it shouldn't come as a surprise that Community Emergency Response Training, or CERT, started here. Take Two contributor Adrianna Cargill participates in one neighborhood training.

More on KPCC.org

CERT trainees find Christian Smith and carrying him out of the building to safety and medical help at the triage center they have set up. Photo credit: Audrey Alden
CERT trainees find Christian Smith and carrying him out of the building to safety and medical help at the triage center they have set up. Photo credit: Audrey Alden
Audrey Alden