News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.

What happened to past migrant caravans? Holograms in Los Angeles, spreading your ashes at Disneyland




Central American migrants traveling in the
Central American migrants traveling in the "Migrant Via Crucis" walk to their legal counseling session in Tijuana, Mexico for breakfast and legal counseling on April 27, 2018.
GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

49:08
Download this story 35.0MB

As the current caravan of migrants makes its way to the U.S. border, we take a look at what has happened to former migrants who came to the country in a caravan. Plus, the controversy over bringing dead celebrities to life for holographic performances. And, why are people spreading the ashes of their loved ones at Disneyland?

Past Migrant Caravans

(Starts at 1:30)

There's a caravan made up of thousands of migrants slowly making its way through Mexico towards the U.S., but it's not the first caravan of its kind to make this journey. What happened to the others? Where do the migrants stand in the immigration process?

Guest:

CIUDAD TECUN UMAN, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 19:  Members of the migrant caravan push forward at a gate separating Guatemala from Mexico on October 19, 2018 in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala. The caravan of thousands of immigrants, most from Honduras, pushed open the gate on the Guatemalan side and crossed the bridge to Mexico but were then pushed back by Mexican riot police.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CIUDAD TECUN UMAN, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 19: Members of the migrant caravan push forward at a gate separating Guatemala from Mexico on October 19, 2018 in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala. The caravan of thousands of immigrants, most from Honduras, pushed open the gate on the Guatemalan side and crossed the bridge to Mexico but were then pushed back by Mexican riot police. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
John Moore/Getty Images

Church Immigrant Abuse

(Starts at 8:26)

It's for anyone who follows the Catholic Church scandal and cares about how priests were allowed to move from place to place, including to California. Here, immigrants were afraid to report the priests lest they be deported. Now the details are emerging.

Pot in Riverside

(Starts at 14:18)

Cannabis businesses got the green light to operate in unincorporated parts of Riverside County. County Supervisors hope it will address issues surrounding the illegal businesses that have sprouted since cannabis consumption was legalized in the state. 

Guest:

Disneyland Ashes

(Starts at 20:12)

Disneyland isn't just the happiest place on Earth. It's also a very popular spot to spread earthly remains.

Guest:

Disneyland's Haunted Mansion (seen here decorated for the holidays) has now been around for 40 years.
Disneyland's Haunted Mansion (seen here decorated for the holidays) has now been around for 40 years.
Susan Valot/KPCC

P-22 Hike

(Starts at 27:31)

For the third year in a row, hikers are celebrating L.A.'s famous cougar P-22 by following in his pawprints.

Guest:

More on LAist.com

Beth Pratt starts her journey with a mountain lion tracking collar around her neck and a cardboard cutout of P-22 on her back.
Beth Pratt starts her journey with a mountain lion tracking collar around her neck and a cardboard cutout of P-22 on her back.
Caleigh Wells/KPCC

South Pasadena Bike Path ridealong

(Starts at 32:23)

The new South Pasadena bike path opened over the weekend. Take Two's Sue Carpenter joined  former South Pasadena mayor and current SoPas councilman Michael Cacciotti, who spent 12 years working with stakeholders and finding funding for the $2 million bike path along the Arroyo Seco. The bike path officially opened October 20.

South Pasadena City Councilman Michael Cacciotti takes a minute to admire the view along his city's new Arroyo Seco bike trail, which opened October 20. He says it's the first time in 65 years that people have been able to enjoy this particular view of the entire western San Gabriel Valley, looking north toward Pasadena.
South Pasadena City Councilman Michael Cacciotti takes a minute to admire the view along his city's new Arroyo Seco bike trail, which opened October 20. He says it's the first time in 65 years that people have been able to enjoy this particular view of the entire western San Gabriel Valley, looking north toward Pasadena.
KPCC/Sue Carpenter

Holograms of the recently deceased

(Starts at 38:13)

Recently, famous deceased figures like Ronald Reagan and Roy Orbison have ended up on stage--in SoCal—in hologram form. And Amy Winehouse's image is actually going on tour next year. So why are holograms becoming more popular and what's the debate over using images of the deceased?

Guest:

What’s your LA ghost story? 

Los Angeles has the reputation of being a pretty haunted place. Landmarks like the Hollywood Roosevelt hotel, the Queen Mary and Griffith Park are known as spooktacular destinations — especially this time of year. So, in the true spirit of the Halloween month, Take Two producers want to know: Do you have a personal spooky story that took place here in Los Angeles? We had great stories last year, and we'd love to share yours. Submit it here