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Power poles and fire, it's not surprising ballots are still being counted, transition in the Governor's Mansion




PORTER RANCH, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 09: The Woolsey Fire is seen looking towards the west valley area on November 9, 2018 in Porter Ranch, California. About 75,000 homes have been evacuated in Los Angeles and Ventura counties due to two fires in the region. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
PORTER RANCH, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 09: The Woolsey Fire is seen looking towards the west valley area on November 9, 2018 in Porter Ranch, California. About 75,000 homes have been evacuated in Los Angeles and Ventura counties due to two fires in the region. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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As the Camp and Woolsey fires continue to rage in California, we look at the role power poles might play in sparking wildland blazes. And, we speak with a climatologist for an explanation of "negative rain." Plus, a new state task force report has a plan to end child poverty. 

Vote Count 

(Starts at 0:51)

The vote counts continue to pour in from last week’s elections and there are still many races that are too close to calls. Here's why we shouldn’t be surprised that ballots are still being counted.

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The role power poles play in sparking wildland blazes

(Starts at 7:42)

It could take months for investigators to determine the cause of the Woolsey fire. But Southern California Edison has told state regulators it had a disturbance on a circuit at its substation in Chatsworth two minutes before the Woolsey fire broke out nearby. Electric utilities' equipment starts about ten percent of all wildland fires in California, but they can be responsible for up to one-half the acres burned. That's got some people questioning whether the big utilities have done enough to reduce the risk. 

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Evaporation and Fires

(Starts at 14:27)

Scientists have developed a system to measure evaporation as a way to understand the effects of drought—evaporation is fine normally but when drought becomes too intense it can lead to too much dried out soil and plant life. And dried out land and plants can lead to fires like we’ve seen recently, especially when combined with high winds. SO the evaporation index could now be used to help predict what specific areas are at high fire risk.

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Evaporative Demand Drought Index map for California for the two weeks ending in November 9, showing how high evaporative demand has been leading up to the current fires.
Evaporative Demand Drought Index map for California for the two weeks ending in November 9, showing how high evaporative demand has been leading up to the current fires.
Courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Rams Game

(Starts at 18:58)

The highly anticipated game between the Kansas City Chiefs and L.A. Rams will no longer be in Mexico City as planned because of poor field conditions at Estadio Azteca. That game will now have a home at the L.A. Memorial Coliseum on Monday night. And that’s exciting for us here, not JUST because of the standoff between the Rams and Chiefs. Both teams are 9 to 1. To bring up morale in a state that endured a shooting last week AND is literally on fire, the Rams are giving away thousands of tickets to people affected by those tragedies and their first responders in SoCal.

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Governor-elect Gavin Newsom

(Starts at 24:20)

As Gavin Newsom prepares to take the helm of the Golden State, questions remain about how the former Lt. Governor will build on Jerry Brown's successes. What does his past work tell us about what kind of leader he will be? Will Newsom spend the same way?

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