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Fire-resistant homes can still burn, Low-budget go bags, Tuesday Reviewsday




A wildfire burns along a hillside near homes in Santa Paula, California, on December 5, 2017.
A wildfire burns along a hillside near homes in Santa Paula, California, on December 5, 2017.
RINGO CHIU/AFP/Getty Images

It's been a year since the Thomas Fire, one of the state's most destructive. We'll hear why so many newly-constructed houses burned, and how you can put together an emergency "go bag" on the cheap. Plus, the latest new music.

Brad Sherman

The Trump Administration is in the process of negotiating a nuclear power plant deal with Saudi Arabia. But some are concerned that nuclear material for a reactor might be used to develop a bomb. On Monday, California Congressman Brad Sherman unveiled legislation that would hand Congress more power to block this deal if certain conditions aren't met.

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New homes can still burn

For anyone who might have to deal with a fire threat, it's sobering to know that while fire-resistant features are important, in the end where you build may be the biggest factor determining whether your house will burn.

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Low-cost go bags

When emergency strikes, sometimes people have no choice but to drop everything they're doing and get away from danger. But what to bring? A group of Take Two staffers joined an urban survivalist to learn how to make their own emergency go bags.

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Arrest Rates

The number of people being put in handcuffs in California is down-- way down. The arrest rates in recent years are the lowest the state has seen in decades. But some groups-- most notably, African Americans-- still account for a disproportionate number of arrests. That's according to a new report from the Public Policy Institute of California.

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PPIC chart of arrest rates.
PPIC chart of arrest rates.
PPIC

Three Feet

Alright, pop quiz. If you're driving and need to pass a cyclist, how many feet of space do you have to leave between you and the bike? The right answer? Three feet. There are a whole bunch of scenarios that endanger cyclists on the roads. And this requirement is supposed to deal with one of them, when drivers pass too close to people on bikes. That happens because streets are narrow, drivers are distracted, or sometimes out of road rage. Three feet became the law of the land four years ago, and was hailed as a way to cut down on the more than 100 deaths a year in bicycling collisions across the state. KPCC's Aaron Mendelson decided to see how it's working.

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Tuesday Reviewsday

Our weekly look at the best new music releases includes Sasha Sloan's "Loser," Loud Forest's "In Your Eyes," Kaytranada's "Nothin Like U" and Victor Oladipo's "V.O."

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