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What to expect from the new governor, immigration courts and the shutdown, year of the scooter




LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 06: Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom speaks during election night event on November 6, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.  Newsom defeated Republican Gubernatorial candidate John Cox. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 06: Democratic gubernatorial candidate Gavin Newsom speaks during election night event on November 6, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. Newsom defeated Republican Gubernatorial candidate John Cox. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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Jerry Brown passes the torch to Gavin Newsom

The swearing-in ceremony for Governor-elect Gavin Newsom took place Monday. It was the first time since the 1800s that a Democratic governor here has handed off power to another Democrat. Now, California's economy is in A LOT better condition than it was in 2011 when outgoing Governor Jerry Brown took the reigns. So, what can we expect with Gavin Newsom now that he's in the top spot?

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https://youtu.be/D_CtFOMEm1g?t=3343

Immigration Courts and the Shutdown

America's immigration courts are closed during the federal government shutdown. That means people who have appointments during this time will miss out on their court dates and have to go to the back of the line when rescheduling. We explore the other effects of this shutdown.

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LAUSD Funding

Members of the teachers’ union in LA could strike this Thursday if a deal cannot be reached with officials from LA Unified. Among the demands are an increase in salary, plus more funding to reduce class sizes and hire more nurses and librarians, but the district says is it cannot afford all of it and has directed concerns to the state. We dive into funding issues in LAUSD and other districts in the state.

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Members and supporters of United Teachers Los Angeles, the union representing L.A. Unified School District teachers, wave signs during a demonstration along Firestone Boulevard in South Gate on Weds., Oct. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kyle Stokes/KPCC)
Members and supporters of United Teachers Los Angeles, the union representing L.A. Unified School District teachers, wave signs during a demonstration along Firestone Boulevard in South Gate on Weds., Oct. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kyle Stokes/KPCC)
KPCC/Kyle Stokes

Garcetti Hurdles

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has been pondering a 2020 run for president. If he does decide to go for it, he could have a hard time balancing his mayoral duties on the campaign trail. 

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On the Lot

The winners, losers, speeches, and all the memorable moments from the Golden Globes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56kiM-sM0LU

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Scooters in 2019

Electric scooters became the hot mode of transportation last year. They were loved by some, hated by many and cities all over the L.A. area sought to regulate them. But what to expect from them this year? Meghan McCarty Carino found out more.

Young women ride shared electric scooters in Santa Monica, California, on July 13, 2018. - Cities across the U.S. are grappling with the growing trend of electric scooters which users can unlock with a smartphone app. Scooter startups including Bird and Lime allow riders to park them anywhere that doesn't block pedestrian walkways but residents in some cities, including Los Angeles, say they often litter sidewalks and can pose a danger to pedestrians. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Young women ride shared electric scooters in Santa Monica, California, on July 13, 2018. - Cities across the U.S. are grappling with the growing trend of electric scooters which users can unlock with a smartphone app. Scooter startups including Bird and Lime allow riders to park them anywhere that doesn't block pedestrian walkways but residents in some cities, including Los Angeles, say they often litter sidewalks and can pose a danger to pedestrians. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP) (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

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