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Men's Central Jail plans, Is there still a drought in SoCal? Desert X art show




The Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, 10 September 2006.
The Men's Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, 10 September 2006.
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

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We look at efforts to remake the Men's Central Jail to better help inmates with mental health issues. Plus, we find out how the recent rains are impacting the drought. And, we take a trip to the Coachella Valley's Desert X modern art festival.

Men’s Central Jail

( Starts at 0:35 ) 

After years of discussion, the L.A. County Board of Supervisors could be putting the brakes on a $2 billion plan to demolish the Men's Central Jail. 

Guest:

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Detention Beds

( Starts at 07:18 ) 

It looks like the federal government could be heading toward another shutdown at the end of this week and one of the sticking points this time is a debate over immigrant detention facilities. As Congress has been negotiating over a border security funding bill. Democrats added a provision over the weekend that Republicans are pushing back against. Democrats want to CAP the number of immigrants detained detention beds for arrests in the interior of the country at 16, 500 beds. They also want to cap the overall ICE detainee population at about 35,000 for the rest of the fiscal year 2019. That's down from the roughly  40,000 beds that Congress currently authorizes and pays for. The Trump Administration says it needs more beds, however, because facilities are already at—or above—capacity. 

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National Guard

( Starts at 13:33 ) 

Last April, then-Governor Jerry Brown complied with a Trump administration request to send 400 National Guard troops to the state's Southern Border. Now, Governor Gavin Newsom has ordered their removal. The announcement comes one day ahead of his State of the State address in which he's expected to say that the so-called border emergency is a manufactured crisis. Members of the Guard will be redeployed elsewhere. So what will this drawdown mean at the border?

Guest:

Kevin de Leon and Jose Huizar

( Starts at 20:59 ) 

Former State Senate leader Kevin de Leon energized young voters and a more liberal branch of California's Democratic party last fall during his failed Senate bid. Though he didn't win, he shocked many in the party by mounting a credible challenge against California's longtime senior Senator Dianne Feinstein. Many speculated about what his next move would be and today we know: de Leon announced this morning he's running for an L.A. City Council Seat.

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Doctor Shortage

( Starts at 27:30 ) 

There's a crisis looming in California. In the near future, there may not be enough health care professionals to meet the state's needs especially as more baby boomers reach retirement age. Making matters worse, some of those boomers are doctors or nurses themselves ... and there aren't enough FUTURE health care workers in the pipeline to replace them. But there is a plan to prevent that from happening.

Guest:

Is the Drought Over?

( Starts at 34:30 )  

L.A. has seen a lot of rain and snow in the mountains in the last few weeks, so what does all that water mean for the drought? Well, it certainly doesn't hurt, but it's going to take more than one great year to bring L.A. out of the drought conditions it faces.

Guest:

The image shows the drastic changes in river flow during drought years from 2011 to 2014 along the Sacramento River in California, which serves as an example of what most of the natural waterways in California are experiencing.
The image shows the drastic changes in river flow during drought years from 2011 to 2014 along the Sacramento River in California, which serves as an example of what most of the natural waterways in California are experiencing.
UCLA School of Sustainability

Desert X

( Starts at 39:35 ) 

Desert X returned to the Coachella Valley over the weekend, bringing awareness of environmental and immigration issues through art. The second installment of the free biennial modern art event features 19 works scattered across 55 square miles of desert.

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