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White House says President Trump will declare a national emergency and sign funding bill, USC reforms, Frieze LA




WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 18: (AFP OUT)  U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room of the White House, July 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 18: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Cabinet Room of the White House, July 18, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
Pool/Getty Images

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We find out more about President Trump's decision to declare a national emergency. Plus, we get the latest details on a new lawsuit filed against the University of Southern California alleging sexual battery. And, we walk through the new Frieze L.A. art fair opening at the Paramount Pictures lot this weekend.

National Emergency 

( Starts at 0:18 ) 

Senator McConnell said the president will sign the border security bill and declare a national emergency. Since that statement, the Senate did vote for the border security bill hashed out earlier this week to avert another partial government shutdown from starting on Friday. 

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University of Southern California reforms

(Starts at 12:18 ) 

Let's get the latest on the legal troubles facing USC. Earlier this week, six gay and bisexual men filed a lawsuit against the university, alleging sexual battery at the hands of a doctor in charge of men's health. It comes on the heels of a $215 million class-action settlement reached Tuesday, which puts in place new safeguards to prevent sexual misconduct. It also outlines how victim compensation will be determined. 

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Farmers and Climate Change

( Starts at 18:25 ) 

Climate change will have dramatic effects on all of us, including businesses. And one of the businesses that is likely to feel those effects early on is agriculture. California is home to some 77 thousand farmers, many of whom are hungry for information on how to adapt to climate change.To help them, California Assemblymember Monique Limon has introduced Assembly Bill 409. Her district includes Santa Barbara and Ventura. The legislation proposes $2 million in funding that would help develop planning tools and training for the state's agricultural industry.

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Irrigated agricultural land on the Oxnard Plain, north of Los Angeles from the National Archives
 / Charles O'Rear 1941
Irrigated agricultural land on the Oxnard Plain, north of Los Angeles from the National Archives / Charles O'Rear 1941
Charles O'Rear / National Archives

Valentine's Day Love Stories

Now, on this Valentine's Day ...Let's hear about a little LOVE. So on Thursday, we're focusing on love stories that bare the label: made in L.A. Listeners share their love stories. Listen to them below!

Your Earthquake Questions Answered

( Starts at 38:18 ) 

KPCC's new podcast The Big One: Your Survival guide has inspired a lot of us to pay attention to an inevitability: An enormous and overdue earthquake along the San Andreas fault. And it's inspiring a lot of questions about liquefaction zones, retrofitting homes and whether your car is a safe place.

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Frieze L.A.

( Starts at 28:54 ) 

With last month's L.A. Art Show downtown and this month's Desert X exhibition in the Coachella Valley, the global art world axis already seems to be tilting toward Los Angeles. And now there's another major art fair putting down stakes in SoCal. It's called Frieze L.A., and it opens tomorrow at Paramount Pictures Studios in Hollywood. More than 70 exhibitors will be showing off sculptures and installations for potential buyers.

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