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LA wastewater recycling, Anaheim stadium assessment, lowrider culture in Japan




Solar panels are mounted on the roof of the Los Angeles Convention Center on September 5. The state's governor has signed a landmark bill setting a goal of 100 percent clean energy for the state's electrical needs, by the year 2045.
Solar panels are mounted on the roof of the Los Angeles Convention Center on September 5. The state's governor has signed a landmark bill setting a goal of 100 percent clean energy for the state's electrical needs, by the year 2045.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

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L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti unveiled his plan to recycle 100% of the city's wastewater by 2035. Plus, Anaheim is assessing the value of Angels Stadium. And, L.A.'s lowrider culture is big in Japan.

Los Angeles Water Recycling Plan

( Starts at 0:55 ) 

Mayor Eric Garcetti has a new goal for Los Angeles: recycling 100 percent of our wastewater. But it'll take 16 years and $2 billion to do it. How do sanitation officials plan to make that happen? The biggest piece of the puzzle involves upgrading the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant, the largest such facility in the western United States. Located near LAX and Dockweiler Beach, the plant is L.A.'s oldest and largest wastewater treatment facility (roughly the size of Disneyland). It processes 260 million gallons of wastewater every day, recycling roughly a quarter of that.

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Anaheim Angels Stadium

( Starts at 7:48 ) 

They're called The Los Angeles Angels. But how would it sound if they were called The Los Angeles Angels of Tustin or  Irvine? For the past couple years, Anaheim and the team were negotiating whether the Angels should stay. And earlier this week, the city made the next move: officials voted to see how much the stadium property would be worth to them with or without the Angels.

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Solar Bill of Rights

( Starts at 20:01 ) 

Installing rooftop solar panels is often cost prohibitive for California homeowners. Even figuring out how to go about doing it can seem overly complicated. And then there's the matter of fair compensation for the extra electricity individuals' solar panels generate that is then resold by utilities. That's why two California senators introduced something called the Solar Bill of Rights in the state legislature earlier this week. Senate Bill 288 seeks to protect the rights of consumers who want to generate and store their own clean energy on site by removing tariffs and other barriers.

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Clean Power Alliance

( Starts at 15:50 ) 

Hey, Southern California Edison customer: Ready or not, you and nearly a million of your fellow ratepayers may have been involuntarily enrolled in a new kind of government-run power utility called the Clean Power Alliance. One-fifth of Edison's customers were opted into the alliance by 31 city or county governments beginning this month. But don't worry. You still have choices. You can bail out if being part of an effort to pay less for energy generated from renewable sources (solar, wind, etc.) isn't your thing.

Lowrider Culture in Japan

( Starts at 26:34 ) 

The lowrider lifestyle is a concept we're all familiar with here in Los Angeles with highly modified, wildly colorful Chevys, Fords and other American makes cruising around town. It's been a part of L.A. culture dating back to the 1940s. But it's a subculture that's also taken hold in various countries around the world - including Japan.

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https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1098054650417295360

Your Earthquake Questions Answered

( Starts at 35:59 ) 

Say a major earthquake hits and you're sleeping. Are you safer in your bed or getting out of it? What if an earthquake hits and you're downtown? Do you need to look out for falling glass? These are some of the questions we're answering today.

Guest:

Stephanie Kraft

Who Cleans Hollywood's Walk of Fame Stars?

( Starts at 42:43 ) 

The Oscars are this weekend. And while many of the streets around Hollywood's Dolby Theater have been closed for days, including parts of the Walk of Fame, the thousands of stars embedded in the sidewalk remain ready for their closeup.

A tourist walks in the rain on the stars of the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Hollywood, California, on December 22, 2010. Downtown Los Angeles received one-third of its annual average rainfall in less than a week. As of midmorning yesterday, the rain gauge at the University of Southern California campus recorded 5.77 inches(14.6cm). AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
A tourist walks in the rain on the stars of the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Hollywood, California, on December 22, 2010. Downtown Los Angeles received one-third of its annual average rainfall in less than a week. As of midmorning yesterday, the rain gauge at the University of Southern California campus recorded 5.77 inches(14.6cm). AFP PHOTO / GABRIEL BOUYS (Photo credit should read GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images

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