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Cannabis convictions, Weedmaps, water infrastructure




Marijuana plants grow in a marijuana cultivation facility on July 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Marijuana plants grow in a marijuana cultivation facility on July 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

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We speak with L.A. County District Attorney Jackie Lacey about the plan to overturn thousands of pot convictions. And we find out what officials plan to do about Weedmaps promoting unlicensed pot shops. Plus, SoCal's water infrastructure.

Cannabis Convictions

The Los Angeles County District Attorney plans to clear about 50-thousand marijuana-related convictions. And they'll do it with the help of an algorithm. People with past convictions are eligible to have them reclassified or dismissed under Proposition 64, passed in 2016. But —up to this point—record-clearing has been tough. 

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Weedmaps

Customers looking for a place to buy it often turn to an online review site called Weedmaps. It's kind of like Yelp for pot.But many dispensary owners in L.A. say ads on the website are killing their business. And now they're taking their fight against site to Sacramento. 

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Water Infrastructure

The super bloom already says it's spring, but next week's weather is going to feel a whole lot more like summer. Temperatures are expected to hit the high 80s. And when that happens, a lot of the snow that collected in the mountains this past winter will begin to melt off. Statewide, this year's snowpack is 173 percent above average.

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Spanish-speaking Voters

Over the weekend, Politico took a look at the Spanish translations of the campaign sites of the Democratic presidential candidates for 2020. It found some had no translation or only a partial one. Other Spanish sites seemed strikingly similar to the Google translation of the English site. Those campaigns can, of course, fix those issues pretty easily-- and Politico mentioned that some have started to do so. But reaching out to Latino voters in Spanish as well as English is a broader issue. In California, a 2015 census report showed about 30 percent of the state speaks Spanish at home, which means that producing campaign materials in English and Spanish is something campaigns have to think about.

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California tri-tip

Memphis has ribs, Texas has brisket. What is California's signature style of Barbeque?  Well, the California Report brings us this taste of a central coast delicacy that was once considered scrap meat. Diane Bock has the story.