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Gun violence prevention services, Back to India, lessons learned from a dog




LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 01: People mourn for rapper Nipsey Hussle on April 1, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. The Grammy-nominated artist was gunned down in broad daylight in front of The Marathon Clothing store he founded in 2017 on the day he was scheduled to meet with Los Angeles Police Department brass to discuss ways of stopping gang violence.   (Photo by David McNew/Getty Image)
LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 01: People mourn for rapper Nipsey Hussle on April 1, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. The Grammy-nominated artist was gunned down in broad daylight in front of The Marathon Clothing store he founded in 2017 on the day he was scheduled to meet with Los Angeles Police Department brass to discuss ways of stopping gang violence. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Image)
David McNew/Getty Images

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In the wake of rapper Nipsey Hussle's shooting death, we speak with L.A. County Public Health officials about how to prevent violence. Plus, Indians are returning to their home country because of unfriendly U.S. immigration policy. And, a chat with the chief operating officer of the L.A. Sparks women's basketball team.

LA County Sheriff Alex Villanueva has rehired another deputy fired for misconduct

Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva has reinstated a second deputy who was fired by his predecessor. A source familiar with the 2016 incident that prompted the deputy's termination said he used excessive force as he pulled a man out of a vehicle in Lancaster. The source said Deputy Michael Courtial moved ahead of other deputies on scene and punched the man several times. Villanueva said in a statement that while the deputy's actions should have been "more in line" with the standards he expects, he agreed with a review that found the deputy did not deserve to be fired. It's not clear who ordered the review.

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Cal OES guidelines

California's recent onslaught of disasters has highlighted a major flaw in the state: How residents are alerted to life-threatening situations. Last year, officials hesitated to issue a blanket evacuation ahead of the Montecito mudslides.  And entire neighborhoods in Nothern California's Butte County were NEVER told to evacuate as the Camp fire engulfed the town of Paradise. But now, for the first time, the California Office of Emergency Services is proposing new protocols.

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Gun Violence prevention services

The shooting of rapper Nipsey Hussle in South L.A. on Sunday has put the spotlight on gun violence. On Friday, L.A. County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and Dr. Barbara Ferrer, the director of L.A. County Public Health, plan to unveil a range of violence prevention services, such as gang intervention, grief and trauma counseling and therapy, for the South L.A. community.

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Back to India

California used to be the land of opportunity for skilled workers and students from India seeking IT and tech jobs. But thanks to a ten-year green card backlog, anti-immigrant rhetoric in the U.S. and growing economic opportunity in India, more Indians are opting to move back to their homeland rather than live their California dream. KPCC's Aaron Schrank took a reporting trip to India recently and has this story on Southern Californians who've gone 'back to India' for a better life. 

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Dave Barry: lessons learned from his dog

Best-selling author and humorist Dave Barry has a new book, “Lessons from Lucy - The Simple Joys of an Old, Happy Dog”. Simon & Schuster published the book April 2, and Barry will be a featured speaker at next week's LA Times Festival of Books. Take Two asked him to explain the life lessons he's learned from his dog.

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