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The Violence Project, Red Flag Laws, CA Sea Cliff Erosion




Palms Middle School student Hazel Holmes walked out at 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 14, 2018 with hundreds of her classmates to protest gun violence a month after 17 people were killed in a school shooting in Parkland, Florida.
Palms Middle School student Hazel Holmes walked out at 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 14, 2018 with hundreds of her classmates to protest gun violence a month after 17 people were killed in a school shooting in Parkland, Florida.
Carla Javier/KPCC

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We talk with the researchers behind the Violence Project, who say there are four commonalities among most mass shooters. Plus, how red flag laws work to stop firearms from getting into the hands of those who may commit acts of gun violence. And, what California is doing to prevent the kind of coastal erosion that caused part of a sea cliff in Encinitas to fall on the beach, killing three people over the weekend.

How can things change?

We'll also find out more about the effectiveness of so-called red flag laws, and whether temporarily removing firearms from a person who may present danger could be part of the solution. Because clearly, this sort of gun violence has got to stop. Many of you agree — and listeners called in today and shared with us how they are processing all that happened this weekend— and what they would like to see changed.

The Violence Project

After back-to-back shootings this past weekend that killed 31 people in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio. President Trump called on Americans this morning to unite and combat hate. So how do we fight hatred? The Violence Project is a non-partisan think tank dedicated to reducing violence in society...in part by studying mass shooters. The project aims to use data to understand who commits such massacres ... and find holistic solutions.

Guest:

Red Flag Laws

There is still a lot we don't know about the two shootings this past weekend. What is clear, though, is that they BOTH had access to rapid-fire weapons capable of taking many lives in a short time. And this commonality, once again, has sparked a public outcry for stricter gun controls. 

Guest:

Sea Cliff Erosion

A deadly seaside cliff collapse in Encinitas took the lives of three beachgoers on Friday. There are now concerns about the stability of the state's ocean bluff and what is being done to prevent similar tragedies.

Guest:

How to cope and talk to kids

What can be done to cope and counsel our children when it comes to talking to them about shootings like the two that occurred over the weekend.

Guest:

"Burn the Ice"

It's an exciting time to go out to eat in Los Angeles right now. You could drop 250-dollars per person at Vespertine where you could be served what looks like a black pool cue only to be told it's fish remolded and pounded into this unrecognizable sculpture. Or you could eat dollar-tacos on a curbside and swear that they were probably some of the best food you've ever tasted. But it hasn't always been like this. Ages ago people would claim that the finest food in L.A. could only be had at a storied place like Spago. That mindset began to change in the mid-2000s when a restaurant revolution happened all over the country.

Guest: