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Use Of Force Law, K. Connie Kang, School Air Conditioning




Ryan: Merlin (Falco columbarius) This small falcon preys on pigeons.
Ryan: Merlin (Falco columbarius) This small falcon preys on pigeons.
MoonRhino via Flickr Creative Commons license

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We look at the new Use of Force law in California. Plus, remembering K. Connie Kang -- the first female Korean journalist in the United States. And, air conditioning in schools and how it relates to the achievement gap.

Use of Force

California now has the strictest rules for when police officers can open fire on a suspect. The new law comes by way of a bill signed this afternoon by Governor Newsom. The measure comes after months of negotiations with law enforcement groups.

Guest:

K. Connie Kang

K. Connie Kang, notable Korean American journalist passed last week from pancreatic cancer. She was 76. A Martinez speaks with Hyunwon Kang, mentee and former colleague from the LA Times about Kang’s influence and legacy for Korean Communities in Los Angeles.

Guest: 

K. Connie Kang and Hyungwon Kang pictured together while covering Korea stories together in 1987-1988 when Connie was San Francisco Examiner Seoul Bureau Chief, and when Hyungwon was a freelance photographer working for LA Times and TIME Magazine.
K. Connie Kang and Hyungwon Kang pictured together while covering Korea stories together in 1987-1988 when Connie was San Francisco Examiner Seoul Bureau Chief, and when Hyungwon was a freelance photographer working for LA Times and TIME Magazine.
Hyungwon Kang

Falcons

Have you ever been to the beach, enjoying some fries...or maybe a hot dog and then all of a sudden: SWOOP. A seagull flies in and steals your grub? It's a problem. Along with pigeons and blackbirds, seagulls are considered nuisances at beach resorts, airports, farms, and office buildings. That's why, instead of opting for spikes, nets or fake owls commercial buildings are calling on the natural predator of these birds: the falcon.

Guest:

Air Conditioning in Schools

As back-to-school season and record-breaking heatwaves collide, new research finds that extreme heat contributes to the racial education achievement gap, and could even reduce future earnings potential for low-income and minority students. Climate change will likely make matters worse.  Up to 40% of U.S. schools may not be fully air-conditioned.

Guest:

Comfort Women

There are continuing efforts in SoCal to remember the Korean women forced into Japan’s World War II-era military brothels. Though it happened decades ago and an ocean away, a large Korean American diaspora in L.A. is keeping the issue alive through erecting statues, developing public school curriculum, even bringing a musical about comfort women to a downtown theater this month.

Guest: 

Rainbow Halos

On Friday, LADOT dedicated the first of several Rainbow Halo Memorials at Woodman Avenue and Addison Street in Council District 4 near the scene of where a hit-and-run driver killed 16-year-old Conor Lynch during afternoon cross country practice in 2010. The Los Angeles Department of Transportation will install 100 Rainbow Halos Memorials around the city to memorialize individuals who died in traffic crashes. The Rainbow Halos are multicolored discs that hang overhead on a signal, light, or signpost at or near the site of a fatal traffic collision. When sunlight shines through the disc, it casts a rainbow-colored shadow on the ground. An accompanying plaque explains the significance of the halo.

Magic Castle

At the top of a winding driveway on the edge of Hollywood Heights sits a huge Victorian mansion - home to LA's mysterious "magic castle." The California Report's Jessica Placzek went inside.