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"Tlayuda", a typical dish from Oaxaca prepared with a large corn tortilla, spread lard, ground beans, shredded cheese, chopped tomato, dried beef (Tasajo) and sausage, served at the "Chabelita" restaurant belonging to Andrea Hernandez Cuevas in the "20 de Noviembre" market, on February 23, 2017 in Oaxaca, Mexico. / AFP PHOTO / OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)
OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images

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OAXACALIFORNIA PANEL

We want to bring you a conversation we had a few months ago about Oaxacan food and the special relationship between California and that Mexican State. The connection is so deep that there is a thing, if you will, called Oaxacalifornia. Call it a state of being, a movement or just something that defines the many indigenous people who’ve come from Oaxaca to live, work and contribute to the golden state.  In Los Angeles alone, there are some 200,000 people from Oaxaca living here with many settling in neighborhoods in Koreatown and  West LA, near Palms and Mar Vista.
Guests:

Musso and Frank

Musso and Frank is about as vintage as a Los Angeles restaurant gets. At 100 years old, the nostalgic Hollywood joint still serves many of the same dishes it did in 1919, the year it opened. What goes well with late capitalism, environmental collapse and rising fascism? Maybe a side of creamed spinach. The legendary restaurant celebrated its 100th anniversary with the release of their first book

Guest:

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Musso & Frank Grill, Hollywood
Musso & Frank Grill, Hollywood
Dave Coelho/KPCC

Soul Food in LA

Let’s talk about soul food. What exactly is “soul food”? It has become a blanket term to describe African-American cuisine although its origins pre-date slavery. It’s culled from European, indigenous and African influences but many of its key ingredients are rooted in the inhumane rations provided to African slaves by their masters. From the undesirable parts of pigs came neckbones, chitterlings, and other mainstays, while meager amounts of cornbread were used to bread and fry catfish and other meats. A quick web search turns up no less than 400 results in Los Angeles alone! With SO many choices, it might be hard to know where to go.

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Chicken and mac and cheese at Dulan's Soul Food Kitchen in Inglewood. (Photo by Jay Connor for LAist)
Chicken and mac and cheese at Dulan's Soul Food Kitchen in Inglewood. (Photo by Jay Connor for LAist)
Jay Connor/LAist