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Impeachment Articles Pass to the Senate, Airplane Fuel Dump, Weinstein Trial Underway




The House SAA Paul Irving (L0 and House clerk Cheryl Johnson (2nd R) followed by Impeachment Managers leave the Senate Chamber after delivering the Impeachment Articles of US President Donald Trump signed by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi on Capitol Hill January 15, 2020, in Washington, DC. - The US House of Representatives voted Wednesday to transmit articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, opening the way for the historic trial of the 45th president for abuse of power. (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY / AFP) (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images)
The House SAA Paul Irving (L0 and House clerk Cheryl Johnson (2nd R) followed by Impeachment Managers leave the Senate Chamber after delivering the Impeachment Articles of US President Donald Trump signed by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi on Capitol Hill January 15, 2020, in Washington, DC. - The US House of Representatives voted Wednesday to transmit articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, opening the way for the historic trial of the 45th president for abuse of power. (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY / AFP) (Photo by OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images)
OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

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Impeachment Article Pass-off

Just hours ago, the House voted to send the TWO articles of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate.  Those articles include abuse of power and obstructing Congress.  The vote came on the heels of a major announcement this morning by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi — when she announced the SEVEN House members who serve as impeachment managers in the coming Senate trial of President Trump. Among those Seven— TWO Californians. House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff and San Jose Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren — a senior member of the House Judiciary Committee, who played a role in the impeachments of Presidents Nixon and Clinton. This hour, House managers will walk the articles of impeachment to the Senate. Then the impeachment trial of President Trump will begin in earnest.

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Fuel Dump

The city of Cudahy, California is still reeling from an incident yesterday when a fuel dump by a Delta airline plane ended up dousing school children with strong vapors. No major injuries were reported  - only some skin irritation. But still, there are a lot of questions being asked about WHY this happened. According to the recorded exchange between the plane and Air Traffic Control at LAX, the pilot reported an engine issue but then said things were under control. When asked if the plane wanted to dump fuel, the pilot said, "negative." But it happened anyway. The FAA is currently investigating.

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WeHo Log Cabin

A longstanding West Hollywood meeting place for people trying to get sober is facing the wrecking ball, and that's upset many in the community. The shabby wooden building known as the Log Cabin has played host to innumerable alcoholics and narcotics anonymous groups over the decades. But the City of Beverly Hills has ordered the place torn down. KPCC's Robert Garrova spent some time at the Log Cabin yesterday and joins me now. 

On the Lot

The reckoning around Hollywood's mental health problem has arrived. Industry leaders say they are trying to eliminate the stigma and provide help to those working in a stressful, high stakes business. Plus, jury selection for the Weinstein trial is well underway...and they're running into some snags.

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Australia Fires

More than 15 million acres of grassland have burned in Australia due to multiple wildfires that broke out last month. According to the New York Times, that's an area seven times larger than what burned in California in 2018, the state's most destructive year on record.  That year, Australia sent firefighters over here to help battle those blazes.  Now the U.S. is returning the favor, with over one hundred and fifty American firefighters helping to fight the flames Down Under. So far, more than two dozen people have perished along with hundreds of millions of native animals. Many there say it's the worst fire season they've experienced.

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