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How The Corona Virus is Affecting Local Businesses, The History of the 2 Freeway, Doulas in LA




LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 2:  A motorcyclist rides the Angeles Crest Highway (State Route 2) in the Angeles National Forest on October 2, 2013 in the San Gabriel Mountains, northeast of Los Angeles, California. The Angeles Crest Highway (State Route 2) remains open but campgrounds and other recreation areas as well as services within the Angeles National Forest are closed for a second day due to the partial government shutdown as House Republicans demand that the Senate and President Obama give in to efforts to defund the Affordable Care Act law, also known as Obamacare.  (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 2: A motorcyclist rides the Angeles Crest Highway (State Route 2) in the Angeles National Forest on October 2, 2013 in the San Gabriel Mountains, northeast of Los Angeles, California. The Angeles Crest Highway (State Route 2) remains open but campgrounds and other recreation areas as well as services within the Angeles National Forest are closed for a second day due to the partial government shutdown as House Republicans demand that the Senate and President Obama give in to efforts to defund the Affordable Care Act law, also known as Obamacare. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
David McNew/Getty Images

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Coronavirus Business Effect

Despite the alarming number of cases in China —more than 28,000 as of today— the spread of the virus in the U.S. has been limited. Health officials in Wisconsin confirmed on Tuesday the state's first case of coronavirus, bringing the total number of cases in this country to 12. But with China being hit so hard,  its businesses here in Southern California that are feeling the real pain right now. 

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Coronavirus Xenophobia

There is some good news on the coronavirus front: A patient in Orange County — one of six confirmed cases in California — has been released from the hospital in good condition. And epidemiologists say the disease poses a low risk to people outside of China — but that hasn't stopped xenophobia against Asians from spreading around the world, including right here in Los Angeles.

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DMV License Photo Bill

Do you think you always look bad in your driver's license photo? Then you're in luck. A new law could give you up to three shots at getting just the right picture. It's called AB 2405. It was proposed last week by state Assemblyman Phillip Chen from Diamond Bar. He said it was partly inspired by his work last year where he asked Californians about how to improve the DMV experience. Under his idea, for each extra picture you want, you'll be asked for a five-dollar voluntary donation that goes to driver education programs. Then you can pick the best one out of those three. It would be the second "shot" for this kind of law — a similar one was proposed in 2018 before it stalled out. But right now, if you wanted to get a new picture for your license, you'd have to pay upwards of $32 to get a duplicate ID. In that case, you'd have NO guarantee that you'd like the new pic they would take. If this new law passes, however then you'll be able to start super modeling at the DMV on January first, 2022.

Veteran Peer Counseling

A growing body of research is showing the value of peer counseling for military veterans returning to civilian life. Programs for former service members to support each other have become common around the country, and in some cases have been shown to be more helpful than traditional mental health treatment. KPCC'S Alyssa Jeong Perry reports for the American Homefront Project.

Doulas in Los Angeles

Los Angeles is one of several places around the country that are enlisting doulas to try and improve birth outcomes for moms and babies. Specifically, the target is African American mothers-to-be. That's because here in L.A. County new black moms die at disproportionately high rates and their babies are three times more likely NOT to make it to their first birthday compared to white infants. 

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More on LAist.com

An Ode to the 2 Freeway

As Angelenos, we spend much of our time in the car - a total of 119 hours a year on average, if you go by one account from last year...and much of that is on a freeway. But because we are ALL in it together, we decided to have a little with fun with it. Earlier this week, we put up a little poll asking people to name their favorite freeway.The options were: Route 2, the 110, the 405 or OTHER.

https://twitter.com/taketwo/status/1224789325331582977?s=20

We figured, since most of you are forced to drive these freeways pretty regularly, you're bound to have a favorite. Or at least one you tolerate? For many of you, it is the 2 Freeway that's won your hearts. It picked up almost 40%  of the votes. It's a sentiment echoed by Brenda Rees, who wrote a love letter to the freeway for The Eastsider last year. We asked her to come read it.

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TBT: The Little Known History Of LA's Most Tolerable Freeway...the SR-2

The 2 Freeway runs 87 miles from Echo Park to the San Gabriel Mountains. It's periodically been written about, and it's a favorite for its scenic views and relative emptiness. But once upon a time, the 2 was supposed to cut through Silverlake and intersect with the 101, then continue west through Hollywood and into Beverly Hills all the way to the 405. Consequently, it was once known as the Beverly Hills Freeway. So what happened?

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More on LAist.com

Sea Level Rise Kiribati

As we face the potential threats associated with climate change, we may have some things to learn from our neighbors in the Pacific. A Pacific Island nation called Kiribati is projected to be the first country lost to sea-level rise. To prepare, their government is building sea walls... and bought land in Fiji as a potential refuge. But some residents say they have bigger concerns than climate change. Monique Myers is a California Sea Grant Extension Specialist, and she works on problems in coastal and marine environments. She visited Kiribati and wrote about her experience in an op-ed for the Sacramento Bee.

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