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Athletes Across Professional Sports Halt Games After Police Shooting of Jacob Blake, Why Some Neighborhoods Are More Hot Than Others, The Federal Writers' Project




LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 06: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers celebrates after passing Michael Jordan and moving to #4 on the NBA's all-time scoring list during the second quarter against the Denver Nuggets at Staples Center on March 06, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 06: LeBron James #23 of the Los Angeles Lakers celebrates after passing Michael Jordan and moving to #4 on the NBA's all-time scoring list during the second quarter against the Denver Nuggets at Staples Center on March 06, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images)
Robert Laberge/Getty Images

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Sports Protests

The Milwaukee Bucks refused to play their NBA playoff game last night in protest of the police shooting of Jacob Blake - who remains paralyzed in the hospital. The action was followed by other basketball teams as well as baseball teams, like the LA Dodgers and San Francisco Giants who were also supposed to compete. At one point this morning it was believed that many NBA players would boycott the season but in the end, they voted to resume play. Tonight’s games will also be postponed, however, as the League and the players work out details on how to start things back up.

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Hot Neighborhoods 

Some neighborhoods experience more extreme heat because of racist policies from the past. That's according to a recent New York Times report that found that formerly redlined neighborhoods throughout the U.S. experience some of the highest temperatures in the summer and Los Angeles is no exception.

WPA Federal Writers' Project

We’ve been thinking a lot about how our country can come back from the widespread unemployment...one source of inspiration is the past. After all, the Great Depression caused similar unemployment in the 1930’s and our federal government faced that economic crisis with programs designed to get Americans back to work. They were known as the Works Progress Administration and among the workers who benefitted from the WPA were writers. This weekend marks the 85th anniversary of the Federal Writers Project and the possibility of a new version.

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To find out more about the Federal Writers' Project, you can check out David Kipen's story in the L.A. Times titled "85 years ago, FDR saved American writers. Could it ever happen again?" here