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2020 Census: How Did It Go ?, Census: Political and Economic Stakes, Census: Legal Battles




SAN ANSELMO, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 19: The U.S. Census logo appears on census materials received in the mail with an invitation to fill out census information online on March 19, 2020 in San Anselmo, California. The U.S. Census Bureau announced that it has suspended census field operations for the next two weeks over concerns of the census workers and their public interactions amid the global coronavirus pandemic. (Photo Illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN ANSELMO, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 19: The U.S. Census logo appears on census materials received in the mail with an invitation to fill out census information online on March 19, 2020 in San Anselmo, California. The U.S. Census Bureau announced that it has suspended census field operations for the next two weeks over concerns of the census workers and their public interactions amid the global coronavirus pandemic. (Photo Illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Census: How Did It Go ?

Even though the population count has ended... it is far from over. The data is being compiled and analyzed ...and given everything that has happened around the census this year...there are many questions about how accurate - and representative - that data is. Lawsuits have already been filed ...and more are expected if there are doubts about the count when all the numbers get presented at the end of year. We explain where we stand.

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Census Outreach

Census takers weren't the only people working to count Angelenos this year…Non-profit census advocates also walked door to door trying to boost response rates. One region with some of the lowest participation in LA is Boyle Heights. That's where Kathi Cervantez campaigned with community non-profit Proyecto Pastoral. She joins A Martinez to talk about what it was like to do this work in the middle of a pandemic… and despite last minute changes made by the Trump Administration.

Students Explain the Census

Most of us don't really get what the census does and why its important so we'll let these students from Cal State Northridge explain.

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Census: Political and Economic Stakes 

The 2020 census count has been under a lot of pressure this year. There’s the pandemic of course, which disrupted the process and then Trump administration ended the count early. Now, the White House wants to exclude from the count immigrants living in the country without legal status. That would be a departure from years past - but the supreme court will nevertheless hear the case next month. All of this has sparked fears of an undercount and, for California, the stakes are high from millions in federal funding to the possible loss of at least one congressional seat.

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Census: Community Stakes 

California — and Los Angeles in particular — is hard to count. According to the LA Times, 72 percent of the state’s population belongs to one or another historically undercounted groups. In these communities, the low-response rates can sometimes be attributed to language barriers or fear of sharing information with the government and this year it’s led many census watchers to worry about a historic undercount.

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Census: Data Quality and What Happens Next

The census count just wrapped up a couple weeks ago after the Trump Administration successfully pushed for a shorter timeline. Still, the census is not over because there's still millions of questionnaires to process. It's basically quality control and normally its supposed to take six months, but this year because of all those pandemic delays we were talking about earlier the government is trying to finish up in two and a half. We talk about the risks involved with this truncated schedule.

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Census: Legal Battles

There have already been a number of legal challenges against the census count and more are expected if the are doubts about the results. We get a sense of what's ahead.

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