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Getty Foundation awards $8.45 million in grants for program exploring LA, Latin American art




Hector Hernandez, Bulca, 2015. 20x30 inches. Collection of the artist. Courtesy of the artist and UCR ARTSblock. This work is part of Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles/Latin America.
Hector Hernandez, Bulca, 2015. 20x30 inches. Collection of the artist. Courtesy of the artist and UCR ARTSblock. This work is part of Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles/Latin America.

A retrospective of L.A. murals produced in the 1970s and '80s, an exhibition of photographs from bilingual newspaper La Raza and a collection of border-themed works are among the 43 exhibitions that will comprise Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles/Latin America, a massive exhibition set to debut in fall 2017.

Speaking before a wide swath of the Los Angeles visual arts community, Getty Foundation director Deborah Marrow on Wednesday announced $8.5 million in grants to support exhibitions that will explore art from Latin America as well as art made by Latino artists in Southern California.

The third installment of "Pacific Standard Time" will involve dozens of museums and visual arts organizations in Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego, Santa Barbara and Palm Springs.

The Getty Foundation had already awarded $5.5 million in planning and research grants. The grants announced Wednesday are for the actual execution of the shows and to support related publications.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti spoke at the event, held at the former St. Vibiana's Cathedral in downtown Los Angeles. He noted how borders have become a divisive topic in this year's presidential campaigns and said that Los Angeles and the art being showcased in "Pacific Standard Time" could play a crucial role in "breaking down those walls and those barriers." 

Other exhibitions that will be part of PST: LA/LA:

From Latin America to Hollywood: Latino Film Culture in Los Angeles will focus on films that sparked the Chicano and New Latin American cinema movements and extend to the present day. That includes the work of filmmakers Gregory Nava, Lucrecia Martel, Edward James Olmos and Alfonso Cuarón. (The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences )

The US-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility presents the work of contemporary artists who explore the border as both a physical reality and an imaginative one. That includes artists from various disciplines such as design, architecture, sculpture, painting and photography. (Craft & Folk Art Museum)

With an expanded view of Latin America that includes work by Latina and Chicana artists in the U.S., Radical Women in Latin American Art, 1960–1985 focuses on groundbreaking artists like Feliza Burztyn, Lygia Clark and Ana Mendieta. (The Hammer Museum)

Video Art in Latin America is the first major U.S. survey of the subject from the late 1960s until today, featuring works rarely if ever seen in the U.S. (LA><ART)

Mexico/LA: History into Art, 1820–1930 explores how Mexico became California. Following the U.S.-Mexican War (1846–1848), lands that had belonged to New Spain and later Mexico were transformed into the 31st state of the U.S. — and visual art played a strong role in this transformation. (Mexico/LA: History into Art, 1820–1930 )

Read about all 43 on the Getty's website and watch their video presentation (released last May):

Video: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA

 



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