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2016 was a breakthrough year for streaming music




Chance the Rapper became the first artist to get a Grammy nomination for an album that was available only through streaming.
Chance the Rapper became the first artist to get a Grammy nomination for an album that was available only through streaming.
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As much as streaming is now a fact of life in the music industry, in many ways it's still a grand experiment. But Pitchfork senior staff writer Marc Hogan is particularly excited for the future of streaming platforms.

His enthusiasm is not without reason. This year, Amazon introduced its music service, along with a smart speaker; Apple Music continued to gain ground on Spotify, even though Spotify’s number of paid subscribers almost doubled from 2015; and Chance the Rapper became the first artist to get a Grammy nomination for an album that was available only through streaming. According to Hogan:

It's a time when how people are listening to music is almost as interesting as what's happening with music itself.

But maybe the most significant stride for the music industry is the fact that streaming revenues this year will overtake music downloads and CD sales by a wide margin. 

It means that the music industry is now really starting to look at streaming services as a source of revenue. For years there was this resistance to streaming, and now we're seeing streaming to be the future. The question now is what that future is really going to look like and who's going to benefit.



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