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TV trends from the buzziest tech trade show of the year




Attendees visit the OLED Tunnel at the LG booth during CES 2017 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.
Attendees visit the OLED Tunnel at the LG booth during CES 2017 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.
Alex Wong/Getty Images
Attendees visit the OLED Tunnel at the LG booth during CES 2017 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.
Attendees makes their way through the showroom floor at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images


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This weekend, 170,000 people descend on Las Vegas for the annual Consumer Electronics Show, where companies debut their most ambitious and futuristic products.

The Frame host John Horn connected with Lucas Shaw, who covers entertainment for Bloomberg, to hear about where media and content companies fit into this massive trade show. 

Conversation Highlights

1. The rise of the "skinny bundle"

[Companies] see this gradual decline in the number of people who are paying for cable or satellite TV, and they believe that ... the packages are too expensive, there's too many channels and they're unwieldy. And people increasingly like things on demand. You have these big companies, everyone from a telecom company like AT&T, which also owns DirecTV, that has a new "skinny bundle" called DirecTV Now ... Google and YouTube are working on their own [bundles]. 

The CEO of Hulu, Mike Hopkins, spoke at an investor conference earlier this week where he teased some news about this forthcoming live TV service that Hulu's going to sell, which is going to combine what you can already get on Hulu — these on-demand TV shows and movies — with live feeds of different TV channels like CBS and Fox and ABC.

Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins speaks onstage at the 2016 Hulu Upftont last May in New York City.
Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins speaks onstage at the 2016 Hulu Upftont last May in New York City.
Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images for Hulu

2. Streaming services integrated into television sets

There's a move away from relying on the set-top box, and so you have a lot more smart TVs and a lot of devices that hook up right into the TV. Streaming services want to be everywhere they can be, so they're going to get built into that and have those kinds of integrations.

Joaquin Phoenix starred in Spike Jonze's futuristic film,
Joaquin Phoenix starred in Spike Jonze's futuristic film, "Her."

3. The internet of (all) things

Amazon and Google and a couple of other companies [like] Samsung are making a big bet on the "connected home," where you will have one digital assistant connecting you through a bunch of different machines that will help you. You'll use that same [device] to decide what TV you're going to watch, to order groceries, to put on some music — kind of satisfy your every demand. We're getting a little bit closer to the world of Spike Jonze's "Her," where Scarlett Johansson is the voice of this do-it-all assistant for Joaquin Phoenix. 



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