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Lucia Aniello hopes 'Rough Night' is the start of more female-directed hardcore comedies




(L-R) Zoë Kravitz and Ilana Glazer with director/co-writer Lucia Aniello on the set of
(L-R) Zoë Kravitz and Ilana Glazer with director/co-writer Lucia Aniello on the set of "Rough Night."
Macall Polley
(L-R) Zoë Kravitz and Ilana Glazer with director/co-writer Lucia Aniello on the set of
(L to R) Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell, Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon and Ilana Grazer in "Rough Night."
(L-R) Zoë Kravitz and Ilana Glazer with director/co-writer Lucia Aniello on the set of
Behind the scenes of "Rough Night" with co-writers Lucia Aniello and Paul Downs.
Myles Aronowitz


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The new summer comedy, "Rough Night," is about a group of college friends who meet up in Miami for an increasingly crazy bachelorette weekend. 

The film stars Zoë Kravitz, Jillian Bell, Scarlett Johansson, Ilana Glazer and Kate McKinnon:

“Rough Night” was directed by Lucia Aniello. She co-produced and co-wrote the film with her writing partner, and partner in real life, Paul W. Downs. He also co-stars in the film.

The two also work together on the Comedy Central series, “Broad City,” which they both write for and co-executive produce. Aniello has directed several episodes of “Broad City” in which Downs stars as Trey — a personal trainer with a not-so-secret porn star past.

"Rough Night" also makes Aniello the first woman to direct a big studio R-rated comedy in nearly 20 years. It's a distinction that she doesn't take lightly:

I think this is the first [R-rated comedy] to also star women ever with a female director. So that's an even scarier statistic. It's saying that we are okay with some women telling stories, but not necessarily about women, especially when it comes to comedy. That to me is saying that we're not necessarily deeming their comedic performances as important. Which, to me — I find women funnier. No offense guys, love you guys, but I just find women funnier because they experience more things I experience. And so we're saying that it's not as important to offer that kind of comedy to women? That's a bummer ... So I hope that, if anything, this is a success financially, if only so it can open doors for more women storytellers.

To hear the full interview with Lucia Aniello and Paul W. Downs, click the blue player above.



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