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Trying to get over with the new 'Superfly'




Jason Mitchell and Trevor Jackson in SUPERFLY.


“With Superfly, the cast and I were focused on paying homage to the original film, while bringing something new and fresh.  I’m excited for everyone to see this movie the cast and crew worked so hard on.”
 - DIRECTOR x
Jason Mitchell and Trevor Jackson in SUPERFLY. “With Superfly, the cast and I were focused on paying homage to the original film, while bringing something new and fresh. I’m excited for everyone to see this movie the cast and crew worked so hard on.” - DIRECTOR x
Quantrell D. Colbert

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Here's what we have on today's show:

This ain't your daddy's 'Superfly'

(Starts at 20:50)

In 1972, Gordon Parks, Jr.’s film, "Superfly,” answered the call for films that more accurately represented the African-American experience. The setting was Harlem and the soundtrack was a funky Curtis Mayfield score. Now, there’s a new "Superfly" set in modern-day Atlanta with a soundtrack curated by the rapper, Future. The film has been in the works since 2001, but only recently found its legs after Director X took up the script. Known for his music videos for the likes of Jay Z, Rihanna and Drake, he tells The Frame’s John Horn how he updated the tropes of the original for a more socially conscious audience. 

Guest: Director X

The monolithic world of movie reviews

(Starts at 1:15)

A new study from the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative examined reviews of the 100 top grossing films of 2017 posted on the site Rotten Tomatoes to assess gender and race/ethnicity of critics, finding that reviewers are overwhelmingly white and male.

Guest: Claudia Puig, film critic, KPCC's FilmWeek; president, L.A. Film Critics Assn.

The live soundtrack at Dodgers' games

(Starts at 22:17)

Dodgers baseball is a summertime tradition in L.A. The game is full of its own traditions, from the Dodger Dog to the seventh-inning stretch, when the whole crowd sings “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.” And when they do, they’re accompanied by organist Dieter Ruehle. But he does so much more, and The Frame contributor Tim Greiving went upstairs at a recent game to investigate.