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In 'Boy Erased,' gay conversion therapy tears a family apart




Lucas Hedges plays a teenager whose parents (Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe) force him into gay conversion therapy in
Lucas Hedges plays a teenager whose parents (Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe) force him into gay conversion therapy in "Boy Erased."
Focus Features

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On today's show:

The pain of trying to pray-the-gay-away

(Starts at 8:32)

The new film, "Boy Erased," is based on the 2016 memoir of the same name, written by Garrard Conley. As the son of a Missionary Baptist minister, growing up in a small town in Arkansas, church and faith were a big part of Conley's life. But while he was at college, Conley was outed to his parents. After they gave him an ultimatum, Garrard made the decision to check himself in to a gay conversion therapy program. His memoir tells the story of his experiences in the program and how he ultimately left. In the film, Lucas Hedges plays Conley. Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe play his parents. Joel Edgerton adapted the memoir for the screen and directed the film. Conley and Edgerton spoke with The Frame at the Telluride Film Festival this year.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-B71eyB_Onw

Can politicians use any song they want at rallies?

(Starts at 1:02)

Pharrell Williams sent the White House a cease-and-desist letter after his song, "Happy," was played at a recent campaign rally where the president appeared. But does the musician have a legal leg to stand on? U.C. Irvine adjunct law professor Susan Seager helps us sort it out.

The ultimate cabinet of curiosities

(Starts at 19:58)

On Main Street in Santa Monica, right across from a Starbucks and next door to a clothing boutique, there's a shop that’s not like the others — with gears, robots and an intricate model airship in its storefront. And if you’re lucky, it might even be open. The Frame contributor Natalie Chudnovsky takes us inside the odd prop shop known as Jadis.