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Military veterans seek peace through poetry in 'We Are Not Done Yet'




Actor Jeffrey Wright produced the HBO film,
Actor Jeffrey Wright produced the HBO film, "We Are Not Done Yet," about military veterans taking part in a poetry workshop to help heal their psychic wounds.
HBO

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On today's show:

Using art to heal the pain of war

(Starts at 8:15)

In honor of Veterans Day, HBO will air a documentary that tracks how a group of vets with traumatic histories find healing and connection through art. It's called "We Are Not Done Yet" and it's produced by actor Jeffrey Wright, who also appears in the film. The movie follows 10 veterans and active duty service members as they write and stage a collaborative poem. They're participating in a workshop led by the poet Seema Reza, who recruits Wright to help the vets with the performance of the poetry. Reza is chair of the non-profit Community Building Art Works, an organization that helps military people find healing and community through all kinds of art. Among the veterans in the film is artist Joe Merritt, who is vice-chair of the Art Works group. Merritt and Wright talk with John Horn about the project and the film.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiDUJqKxBnc

They had AN ELECTION NIGHT FIELD DAY

(Starts at 1:02)

Stephen Colbert, Seth Myers, Jimmy Fallon, Jimmy Kimmel and Trevor Noah devoted their Tuesday night shows to the mid-term election. L.A. Times TV critic Lorraine Ali tells John who made the most of the dramatic night.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqBoCCleMz4

A composer puts Iran in the rear-view mirror

(Starts at 19:44)

Nima Fakhrara is one of only three Iranian composers scoring video games and Hollywood films. His work includes "The Girl in the Photographs," produced by Wes Craven, and the game "Detroit: Become Human." One of the games he scored recently is about the real-life Iranian Revolution in 1979. And it’s the reason he can’t go home anymore. The Frame contributor Tim Greiving explains.